Pitching the Quintessential Elevator Pitch

Confession: I’d never heard the term “elevator pitch” until this week.  I must have been living in a cave (at least metaphorically).  But it’s what I suspected it might be: a sales pitch.  Another confession: it also had me thinking Muzak, that “homogenized” stuff they used to play many moons ago in, yup, elevators.  (Apparently, Muzak is still piped into retail outlets and the like.  If that’s the case, from what I’ve heard the odd time—I’m not much of a shopper—it’s not nearly as ear-wincing as it was back when.)

Think of your elevator pitch like a blurb for your book or blog (or whatever business you might be in).  In essence, you’re sharing your know-how, your talent.  It should be short and sweet, and persuasive.

persuasive = convincing = compelling = winning

You want to create interest—be that spark . . . flicker . . . trigger that prompts the listener/reader into action.  So what’s the first thing you want to do?  Right.  Focus on the goal; determine your objective.

Given many of us are writers/bloggers, our goal would be to entice readers and, subsequently, generate sales.  What is it about our books or blogs—“products”—that we’d like people to remember?

♦   Something like this might work nicely:  “I’m XYZ, a successful food blogger with 310,500 followers and three books with 45 five-star reviews.”  (If this is you, hat’s off!)

If we can write a two-paragraph blurb, we can write an elevator pitch.  No question.  However, instead of being objective (impartial), like detailing a novel plot or blog theme, we have to be subjective (personal) and provide facts.

♦   Have we sold numerous copies?  Received positive reviews and accolades?  Do we have an abundance of followers?  What makes us stand out (be memorable)?  Why are we unique?

Start with a list attributes and accomplishments.  Jot down 10-20 things that people should know.  If you have bona-fide stats, insert those.  Is there a mission statement?  Add it.  Then edit, keeping only the most vital—unforgettable—facts.  What you pitch must be succinct—no more than 30 seconds.

Do you have something to offer at the conclusion?  A free copy of one of your books?  Tips/advice?  Maybe a contest with a prize?  If you’ve got it, give it.

And speaking of giving, give thought to expressing what you’d like to happen: have a meeting, be followed, receive a response/input, make a sale.  Put forward that ultimate goal.

Consider who you’re pitching to.  An elevator pitch for career/business networking might be different than that for social media.  It depends on the audience and what your goal/focus is.  Having two or more elevator pitches won’t hurt.  And never forget: practice makes perfect.

So do practice that pitch, yes, until it’s perfect.  And demonstrates your passion.  If you’re not excited about who you are and what you do, why should anyone else be?  So when you’re riding on that elevator—literally or otherwise—let your [dynamic] pitch woo the person(s) you’re riding with.

wppitch1

Author: tylerus

I'm primarily a writer of fiction and blog posts, and a sometimes editor and proofreader of books, manuals, and film/television scripts. Fact-checking and researching, organizing and coordinating are skills and joys (I enjoy playing detective and developing structure). My fiction audience: lovers of female-sleuth mysteries. My genres of preference: mysteries (needless to say), women’s fiction, informative and helpful “affirmative” non-fiction. So-o, here I am, staring up a new blog for aspiring and established e-Book writers. The plan: to share the (long) journey of getting to this stage, and share "learnings" and "teachings". There's a lot I hope to accomplish with this blog, but it may be a while before that happens as there's a lot on the ol' plate - taking care of Mom, working full-time, and attempting to get another book in the Triple Threat Investigation Agency series written (never mind blog postings and other writing projects). It's very challenging and it's all good. As I like to say: teeny focused baby steps are just as effective as long forceful strides. It may take a little longer, but we will get there.

6 thoughts on “Pitching the Quintessential Elevator Pitch”

  1. I have quit blogging and am on Instagram and Facebook. On FB ~ Robin O. Cochran and on Instagram I am robincochran55. I had so many followers I could not keep up on all of them. It was not a way to be famous or to sell/make money for me. I enjoy the quicker process of Instagram while staying original. 😊

    Like

      1. I tend to not worry about how many people I connect with and instead just get my writing urges out. I do miss the big numbers. . . Sorry, don’t often stop by the blogging world. Take care and happy Spring! 🌸💮🦋

        Liked by 1 person

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