Playing Private Eye – an Interview with Linda Royale

How does it feel to be a private eye?       I had doubts when Rey suggested we start new careers outside of film and television.  Now, I must confess, playing P.I. feels pretty good.

“Playing” private eye?       Sometimes, it seems like a game, like I’m playing a female Magnum.  [chuckles]  But seriously, there is some “playing” involved—as in play-acting.  On occasion, you have to portray a character or impersonate someone when asking questions or tracking a suspect.

Then, you like being a private eye?       I do.  It’s dangerous sometimes, but it’s exciting, too.  There’s always something new to discover or interesting people to meet.

What do you enjoy the most?       I really enjoy researching, which probably stems back to my script-writing days.  But even as a kid, I was more inclined to read and study.

Your colleague, Rey, proudly stated the two of you are BFFs.  Is that difficult, working with your best friend?       We live together, too, as a matter of fact.  JJ once likened us to an old married couple, overly comfortable in each other’s company.  I’d have to agree.  We’ve known each other a long, long time.  We have our moments—who doesn’t?—but I couldn’t imagine not having Rey in my life.

What was your most dangerous moment as a P.I. so far?       It would have been running out of a house just seconds before a bomb detonated.  Talk about close calls.  I still get goosebumps thinking about it.

What are your long-term goals?       I believe we’re in the private eye business for the long haul, so we may expand the agency.  Personally, I don’t like to plan too far in advance.  The only thing I might commit to: taking more courses.  As I said, I love learning.

What case are you working on right now?       There are two cases: a stalker and a potential jewelry store caper.  That’s all I can share at this moment.

Have you ever killed anyone in the line of duty?       Not yet and hopefully never.  But who knows?

I asked Rey this.  As a P.I., what’s one thing you’re good at and one thing you’re bad at?       I’m good at finding information, rationalizing, and documenting—okay, that’s three, sorry.  [chuckles]  I’m not good at confronting villains and suspects.  Between you and me, I get nervous.

So you find it stressful?       I find it unnerving more than stressful.

How do you combat that when you’re in front of a “bad guy”?       [laughs]  I suck it up.  I’m not an actress, but I can force myself to appear calm, even if I may be quaking inside.

What do you do to relax?       Work out, walk and run, write and blog, and cook.

What’s your pet peeve?       I have low tolerance for nasty, self-centered people.

As a detective, I imagine you’d need a good memory.  Are you easily able to recall small details?       
My memory’s great and yes, I do recall small details easily; mind you, I tend to record them, so there’s something to refer to.  That’s the organized part of me.

How perceptive are you?       
I pick up on people’s sincerity or lack of, but I can’t say I have a private eye’s gut instincts, not like JJ or Rey.

I understand you have estranged siblings, but you’re making an effort to change that.  Would you care to share?       Lido and Loretta and I really didn’t get along during childhood.  The three of us just never clicked.  Our mother had died young and there’d been no father.  Recently, however, we got together for a few days on the Mainland.  After sharing resentments and voicing gripes—essentially, clearing the air—we promised to stay in touch and hold annual get-togethers.  There’s enough hostility in the world and life is so short, why harbor animosity?

Weren’t you married to a jazz artist named Chiffre Royale?       Who’s the private eye?  [laughs]  Yes, I was married quite young, in my teens, to Chiffre.  He was a decent guy and a great sax player until the heroine took control.  He’d have gone far if he’d stayed clean.

Any regrets?       I grew up fast and learned a lot.  I have no regrets.  None at all.

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