Who Wants a Review or Two? I Do, I Do (Yes-sir-ree-Dooooo)!

No question.  This is the era of reviews.  We need them and we certainly want them.  (Because this blog revolves around writing/blogging, that’ll be the focus but, truly, the basics here could hold true for any business.)

I’ve had a couple of good ones for the first Triple Investigation Agency ebook, The Connecticut Corpse Caper.  My goal was to get several for it, as well as the subsequent mis-adventures of my P.I. trio.  Shame on me.  I’ve not actively/avidly pursued this (due to circumstances not quite in my control), but I will—that, my friends, is a wholehearted, determined, steadfast, unwavering promise.

I touched upon Google Reviews several days ago, but there are numerous online review websites—some are free, some not (know what you’re getting into before you commit).  Strive for independent reviews; they tend to be truthful.

Feel free to ask followers for reviews and check to see if it’s okay to post them online.  Also, take a look at blogs and sites that offer free ones.  Be aware, though, many reviewers (if not most) are inundated with requests.  It could prove tricky getting someone to agree to provide one, but persistence and perseverance do bring rewards.

Don’t pay for reviews, tempting as it may be (in earlier days, when none the wiser, I certainly considered it).  Many would view this as unethical . . . and really . . . how much faith could you put into something you shelled out money (or bartered) for?

Never generate fake reviews.  You don’t want to sully your reputation.  As an FYI: they’re also illegal and [often] pretty easy to recognize by readers; a great one amid oodles of so-so ones is going to stand out like the idiomatic sore thumb.  If most folks are anything like me—doing that due-diligence thang—they’ll scrutinize a number of reviews to get the broader picture.

Recognize (accept) that you might receive negative reviews.  People have different tastes and what one person may have found “amazing”, another may find “mediocre”.  Hopefully, those that aren’t as keen, will state so in a professional manner.

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Less positive reviews needn’t be a bad thing, though.  Use the assessment to your advantage.  What’s being said?  How can you use that information to boost or better your writing or blog, service or product?

And if a review does lean toward the negative, don’t be contentious and write a seething response; respect the reviewer’s right to state how he/she feels.  If an erroneous statement or interpretation has been made, provide an [impartial] explanation or clarification.  Above all, if the review isn’t what you were expecting, don’t let it upset you.  Learn from it and move on.

Don’t hesitate to respond to reviews.  Reviewers will appreciate that (we all like to be acknowledged).  And who knows how the “relationship” will play out over time (I’ve made a few wonderful blogging buddies over the last year)?

To get you started—and to circle back to the first post re reviews—check out this YouTube vid re Google Reviews.

Here’s to an abundance of encouraging ones.

You Want to do a Review . . . about WHO?

Your Inbox must be much like mine—full of luscious-sounding deals on how to attract a <bleep> load of traffic to your blog or site, promote yourself, and/or get high-quality press mentions (to name but a few, of course).

Bien sûr!  Yes indeedy-do, I want to accomplish all.  Dilemma: I don’t have the time [truly] to do, much less succeed, at even 25% of those things, at least not right now.  There’s one more reason: $$$.  Ain’t got none.  <LOL>  This, too, could [God willing] change some day.

Anyway, a Google email caught my eye: how to use the “about.me” page to do the work for you re generating leads and promoting myself.  Sounds awesome.  All you need do is upgrade to “Pro”.   Yes indeedy-do, as soon as a little extra $ finds its way into the ol’ bank account, sign me up!

After perusing that, a plethora of additional information found its way into an already jam-packed must-read (and eventually, definitely do) folder.  Again, something in the stack stood out: getting Google reviews.  How did I not know about that?!  Or maybe I did, and it simply didn’t register?  <LOL>

It’s fairly simple to request people to do Google reviews—just Google!—and follow these steps (I’ll paraphrase):

  • Search for your name / business name in Google.
  • Click on the “Write a Review” button and then click on “Write Google Review”.
  • A Google Review box pops up.
  • Copy the URL in the address bar.
  • Shorten the Google Review URL.
  • Send it to your clients/followers to get Google reviews.

How much simpler can it get?  Love it (because we know how technically challenged I can be)!

So, as I’m considering the contest to run end of March, I’m also letting ideas take shape re acquiring those Google reviews (like really, WHO doesn’t want some?).

Next post: looking at ways to generate those reviews, short of begging.

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