The Beginnings of E-book Nirvana

Maybe first and foremost let’s decide how to spell that?  Ebook, e-book, or E-Book?  Methinks e-book (coz it works for l’il ol’ me.)

The two main types of publishing—e-book versus traditional—have been touched upon in previous posts.  Now, how about actually writing one?

It’s something you’ve thought and dreamed about, but haven’t yet done.  Check a reason:

  • lassoing time (it’s proven as difficult to snare as a rampaging bull)
  • picking a genre from a cornucopia of possibilities (mystery? romance? western? steampunk?!)
  • deciding between fiction or nonfiction (do I create exploits for crazy characters or advise others on how to construct cuckoo clocks?)
  • settling on a story, plot, and/or focus (huh? uh?)
  • getting <bleeping> started when you’re <bleeping> unsure what to do, and/or
  • other: ____________ (you fill in the blank).

Now that you’ve recognized why you haven’t written one, you can kiss off the reason(s) and move forward, and actually start writing.

Awesome. You’ve got an idea—a tale (or teachings) screaming to be shared!  Go for it.  Put the pedal to the metal, or fingers to the keyboard.  Pen to paper [still] works, too.

Before beginning your chef-d’œuvre, it might be best to determine:

  • where you’re going to write: distractions (pets, kids, partners, coworkers, outdoor views) should be at a minimum, unless you possess superhero skill at blocking out all
  • when you’re going to write; sticking to set schedules is about as easy leaping tall buildings, but figure out the best time of day/night to sit down and then do it.

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If the plan is to write fiction, check out authors writing in your genre.  If it’s nonfiction, research websites and blogs, and authors, centering on the same or similar topic.

Read some e-books in your given genre.  See what’s out there and what’s popular.

Do research before or while you write, or after the first draft (whatever works best for you).  Check facts and stats, settings and locales.  There’s nothing worse than glaring errors (like a famous institution located in the wrong part of town, or a misspelled product or place).

When working on your first draft, try not to worry too much about grammar or typos, logistics or continuity.  Just go with the flow.  Get it all down, then clean up (e-d-i-t).

You may want to do an outline before you start writing.  Some writers do, some (like me) don’t so, again, do what works for you.  You’ll figure it out.

Now, if you’ve got a blog going, consider engaging your viewers and visitors.  Let them know what you’re up to.  Maybe you’d like to request their input?

When that final edit is complete, take a deep breath, and pat yourself [profusely] on the back.  Find an e-publisher and show [off] your baby to the world!

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What’s in Tradition?

Traditional [fiction] publishing, that is.

Save for vanity publishing (something to avoid like picnic potato salad lying under a blazing summer sun all afternoon), at one time, the traditional publishing route was the only [viable] one to take.  It was tough—like hiking up Kilimanjaro when you’re a drive-to-the-corner kind of person.

Fortunately, the world of e-books arrived.  There’s a plethora (gotta love that word) of e-book publishers out there; Smashwords, Amazon’s KDP, Nook Press, and Kobo are to name a few.  You can format your work yourself, design the cover, and pretty much hold carte blanche, unlike in the traditional world where the publisher has creative control (never mind financial when you sign a binding contract).

Forgetting that [most] firms prefer to have agented writers contact them for potential representation—and that getting an agent is as difficult as getting a publisher—the odds of getting published are not in our favor.  Ever hear of the “slush pile”?

According to statistics, in 2013 only 50,000 novels were published; given the number written and submitted, the chances of being one of the “lucky ones” is slim.  As for agents, they tend to reject 99% of the projects received.  Not particularly encouraging, is it?  Rejection just plain sucks.

On a positive note, there’s tons of advice out there for both traditional and “e”, so read, read, read.  Determine what’s best for you.  You might even give the traditional route a try first—to get a feel for it and learn from the experience.

 E-books didn’t exist when I first started writing (I’m aging myself, alas).  For years, I tried acquiring an agent and publisher (whichever came first)—to no avail.  But I kept writing and gaining knowledge (and experience).  In retrospect, I see why I never got far: I had good ideas, but they weren’t executed well.  The great news?  I’ve improved—considerably so (pat on back to moi).

But this isn’t about me.  It’s about persevering, no matter which publishing route you take.  If you have a passion for writing, have at it!  Don’t second-guess yourself and don’t give up or in to fears and frustrations.

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