The Boss’ Blog Tour

Hey, it’s Rey.  (I am so lovin’ writing these posts.  What happened?!  LMAO)

The Boss is doing a blog tour re our second adventure—Can You Hula Like Hilo Hattie?—which has been organized by Jina S. Bazzar.  A huge thank you to Jina!  (There’ll be more about Jina, her blog, and writing in a future post.)

Here’s a rundown on what the three of us from the Triple Threat Investigation Agency—JJ, Linda, and yours truly—experienced during the Hula adventure, as detailed by The Boss.

♦  ♦  ♦

Can you Hula Like Hilo Hattie, the sequel to The Connecticut Corpse Caper, finds the three amateur sleuths—Jill (JJ), Rey, and Linda—serving as bona-fide detectives.  The owners of the newfound Triple Threat Investigation Agency even have a paying assignment, courtesy of their first client, WP Howell: discover the secret of his young, pretty wife, Carmie.  Millions, and a much-desired divorce, rest on it.

What seems straightforward enough quickly evolves into complicated when Carmie’s battered body is found in the sapphire waters of the Hawaiian Pacific.  It soon becomes evident that Carmie was not the only one with a secret, nor the only one to die an untimely death.  Who among a cast of curious, unconventional characters is tenacious (or crazy) enough to eliminate all living liabilities?  JJ, Rey and Linda determine to find out. 

In their quest for answers, the women encounter a plethora of suspects.  It appears there is no lack of people who have a dislike for, or hold a grudge against, Carmelita Sangita Howell.

Their P.I. travels lead them along a few side roads and detours, where drug dealers and informants, treachery and blackmail, abound.  Benny Pohaku, working both sides of the drug-pushing fence, is young and brash, and his arrogance ticks off the wrong people.  Bullets soon silence those boastful lips.  Dealer Cash Layton Jones is as galling as he is attractive, and his habit of entering Jill’s condo uninvited results in a few heated encounters.  He also has JJ wondering if there’s more to the enigmatic man than a penchant for loud Aloha shirts and a proclivity for being “conveniently” close by.

Carmie’s intriguing if not odd, ‘tini friends serve as pieces to an expanding puzzle.  A few have reasons to want her dead.  Jon Jonson, a currently down-and-out musician, has been blackballed by Carmie from playing the local music circuit.  He is definitely no fan of hers.  Stacy Kapu, Carmie’s trainer and former lover, may not have cared to be unceremoniously dumped.  Restaurant co-manager, Benoit Paillisson, has always had a hate-hate relationship with the rich young woman; he has had no qualms about telling people how happy he would be if she fell off the panoramic Pali Lookout.

And there is no love lost when it comes to hubby WP Howell.  What had Carmie “known” that could have proven detrimental?  Was it damaging enough to prompt the man to kill?  Salv Smith, a young Trango gang member, and his affiliation with Carmie is not immediately evident.  Because she sports the same black widow tattoo as her stepson, it appears Lee Smith has a connection to the gang as well . . . and it could be more ominous than anything Salv may be caught up in.

Gino Carpella, Carmie’s twin brother, has been rumored to associate with “questionable sorts”.  It has even been suggested that he had had his sister’s fiancé executed.  Is the rift in the twins’ once caring, close-knit relationship to blame for Carmie’s death?  If so, how?  Or has one of Gino’s enemies retaliated by striking out at his closest family member?

As the women detect, they find relations between people and happenings as clear as the contaminated waters of the Ala Wai Canal.  Fortunately, in addition to perseverance, they receive assistance now and again.  Composed, thorough, and discerning Detective Gerald Ives works closely enough with JJ, Rey and Linda to provide guidance, but not so much as to have them tramp on his toes . . . too much.  A seasoned private investigator residing on Big Island, Petey May, serves invaluable to the women.  His P.I. experience helps in bringing new facts—and evidence—to light.  He also provides JJ with unpleasant news regarding a personal matter.  Their bond will transcend many cases to come.

As the body count increases and the suspect list decreases, the women confirm the murderer’s identity, but proving it will not be easy.  Resolve and help from pretty pink Tasers bring the evasive murderer, and cohort, to their knees.  Literally. 

While major incidents are explained, a few loose ends (and cannons) remain.  These will be addressed, but not necessarily [yet] tied up, in the third novel, Coco’s Nuts.  JJ, Rey and Linda are budding detectives, after all, but they do still have lessons to learn and skills to hone.

♦  ♦  ♦

So there you have it, the Boss’ take on the case.  Not bad.  A bit wordy for my liking (too bad she wouldn’t let me tackle it, LOL).

Again, a big thank-you to Jina.  Please check out her site and work at: https://authorsinspirations.wordpress.com.

WPHulaBannerR

Book Tour Blog Travels

So you’re thinking of promoting your book by doing a book blog tour?  Awesome!  Given I’m doing one in the next while for Can You Hula Like Hilo Hattie?, I thought we could touch upon—review—relevant blog-tour “pointers”.

You’ve completed your first e-book.  You’ve got it properly formatted and the front and back covers look amazing!  How exciting.  Now, you’d like people to read it . . . create excitement . . . get reviewed . . . make sales.  A book blog tour is a great way to make these goals happen.

Now, if your goal is all about making sales, you’ll want to create a buzz before the book is released.  If you want pre-orders, get started a good two-three weeks before the book is released.  If you want books to be purchased upon release, then start your blog tour the day the book is out.

A tour (which can last from one week to several weeks) takes work.  It’s not simply a matter of sending out multiple copies of your e-book.  You have to plan, network, and organize.

Sure, you can pay someone to do it for you (personally, I’m not Rockefeller-rich—not yet, LOL—so I’d prefer to keep my pennies in Mr. Piggy).  If you’re going to pay someone, make sure he/she is reputable: do that due diligence and thoroughly research blog-tour sites.  Get feedback and also check out “buyer beware” sites.  Remember: you get what you paid for.

That said, there are book-tour bloggers who’ll do this for free—t’is true!  You just need to—yup—do that due diligence.  And network.  Learn who’s looking.  Get to know fellow writers/bloggers.  Read blogs regularly.  Comment and participate.  You’ll be amazed how supportive fellow bloggers/authors can be.  Within no time, you’ll have connections who will help you organize a tour . . . but you’ll still have to put in serious effort.

Whether you go solo or have someone assist, be prepared to have the following items ready:

  • review copies of the finished product
  • front cover
  • bio
  • author photo
  • excerpt(s)
  • posts (for guest spots and your own blog to promote the tour)
  • interviews (you’d want at least two, and they should be different)
  • tour banner
  • book trivia (not necessary, but nice)
  • trailer (not necessary, but nice)
  • prize/giveaway (not necessary, but it’s been known to increase traffic)
  • gratitude—be continually thankful.

Don’t forget to promote the tour on social media.  Make sure to follow-up.

There’s a lot to discover on the Internet about book tours, but don’t get overly caught up in all the details.  Become familiar with “ground rules” and plunge in (doing is the best way of learning).

. . . How do you measure your success?  Track comments and blog/media coverage if you like (not my thing, personally, but to each his or her own).  It all depends on what your initial goals were.  Maybe you’d be delighted with one awesome review or stellar guest post versus several here’s-a-new-book posts.  Maybe you’d be glad with a handful of positive comments.  Success—accomplishment—is all about what pleases you.

Happy touring!