Hou Alo-haaaaaaaaaaa

The Boss didn’t quite get it right when we asked her to post about “aloha”; she kind of gave a quick, general overview.  Nothing wrong with that, but we wanted to talk about from a more personal perspective.  So, with that in mind, we’re taking over.

Aloha to me (JJ) is about compassion and patience, goodwill toward our fellow man/woman.  Since I’ve arrived on Oahu, I’ve mellowed some—the Mainland tension has evaporated (for the most part) and I can view things, and people, with a less critical eye.

Two weeks after we’d arrived here, I’d taken The Bus to do some shopping.  A local person smiled and said, “You must have just arrived.  The Mainland stress is visible in your face.”  I’ve never forgotten that.  But you know what?  She was right.  I could feel it in my shoulders and back—that strain we carry from running around  and/or doing too much.  Things do get done without us having to propel ourselves all the time.  Once I got home, I took a few breaths, calmed myself, and started approaching life—and Aloha—with a newfound respect.

I extend Aloha via volunteer work at the animal shelters and listening to those who have no one [else] to say it to.  I attempt not to judge, though I admit that, on occasion, I do.  One day, I plan to overcome this.  But nothing happens overnight.  So, as our Boss oft says: one baby step at a time.

Here’s one of my favorite “aloha” songs and one of my favorite singers: Iz (Israel Kamakawiwo’ole), may he rest in peace. 

Aloha to me (Linda) means being at peace with yourself and others.  Extend gratitude regularly and never take anything or anyone for granted.  It should come freely and unselfishly—like me volunteering regularly to feed the homeless or taking elderly Mr. Koa’s poodle, Mango, for a walk when the kindly old gent’s feeling poorly.  Aloha comes from Mrs. Pahanaa bringing us taro rolls and haupia pie, with a warming smile and heartfelt cheer.  It’s a wondrous thing.

Here’s my favorite “aloha” song, which features several Hawaii’s top artists and 1,000 charter-school youth.  It sends [happy] shivers up my spine whenever I hear it.

Aloha for me (Rey) is all about love—being a good friend and considerate person.  I know I have my moments (Cousin Jilly’s said I can be a real locomotive at times—running through and over things and people), but I do mean well.  Yeah, I need some work but, then, isn’t it said we’re all works in progress?  He-he.

I extend Aloha whenever I can—like providing tips and guidance to Silvie, Mr. Kalani’s fourteen-year-old daughter who lovers her theater-arts classes and wants to be an actress or volunteering to save the endangered monk seal.  I can’t save the world, but I can make a small difference. 

My favorite “aloha” song is by Tia Carrere, a fellow actress with a pleasing voice.  I like the soft, soothing sound; it’s calming.  When I’m having a rough moment, this song will relax me in no time.

You don’t have to live in Hawaii to extend “Aloha Spirit”; you just have to be it, feel it, and do it.

Aloooooooo-haaaaaaaaaaaaa

If you’ve ever come our way and partaken of a tourist venture, you’ll often engage in a robust round of “alooooooooooooooooooooo-haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa”.  It’s cute and kind of funny the first couple of times.  Local people, however, will advise against saying this lovely word that way.

JJ, Rey and Linda, the trio at the Triple Threat Investigation Agency, suggested I post about aloha, which can mean “hello” or “good-bye”.  Did you know that it also refers to love and regard?  And you can use it in conjunction with other words to extend different greetings.  You can’t do that with “hello” or “hi”.

Let’s break it down.

Aloha = “the presence of breath” or “the breath of life”. 

Alo = presence (front and face)

Ha = breath

When you visit the Islands, you’ll hear it repeatedly.  But it’s not just a word, it’s a way of life . . . energy, spirit.  In fact, perhaps you’ve heard “the Aloha Spirit”?

It’s about sharing and respecting, keeping faith and presenting kindness.  In fact, in the earlier Hawaiian years, it meant “God in us”.  It’s the harmonization of our hearts and minds; our thoughts and feelings/emotions must be good, positive.  You can find reference to this in Chapter 5 of Hawai’i Revised Statutes.

Maui elder/linguist Pilahi Paki claimed aloha was more than a definition, it was a legacy, and presented aloha as an acronym:

Akahai, meaning kindness, to be expressed with tenderness;
Lōkahi, meaning unity, to be expressed with harmony;
ʻOluʻolu, meaning agreeable, to be expressed with pleasantness;
Haʻahaʻa, meaning humility, to be expressed with modesty;
Ahonui, meaning patience, to be expressed with perseverance.”

Rather cool, to say the least and something, a code of ethics if you like, we all could—and should—embrace.

May you be blessed this week . . . and may you bless others.  Aloha, my friends.

A Triple Threat Sing-A-Long

Hey.  Rey here.  Got a treat today—all three of us are posting.  The Boss is in a bit of a funk this week.  She’s missing “home” (H-a-w-a-i-i) and can’t find a way of getting here any time soon.  But she’s keeping the faith.

To boost her spirits, we decided to do what she calls “an aside”—we’re sharing about our time on Oahu.  We’ve already posted about our life as P.I.s and our likes and loves about this place, but we haven’t really talked about why it’s so near and dear, how it’s shaped and influenced us.  So, here’s a sum-up from each of us, including what we consider the quintessential mele (that’s Hawaiian for song) from our favorite Hawaiian artist.  . . . Have to laugh.  Linda’s eyes bugged out when she saw me use “quintessential”.  But as I often say: I’m not just a pretty face.

wedpostB

 

Reynalda Fonne-Werde

Life here has softened me a bit.  Yeah, my colleagues think I’m melodramatic and sometimes reckless and self-centered.  I am, I admit it.  When I want something, I go for it.  And I think this is perfectly all right when working a case—a private eye needs to go with her gut.  On the human side, I’ve learned to like animals (a lot) and have taken to saving the monk seals (a cause dear to my heart).  I tend to listen to people more and can be sympathetic and feeling.  So yeah, I’ve definitely softened.  Damn.  I hope I don’t turn into a mush-ball or anything like that.  My quintessential song is by the very talented, and greatly missed, Iz.  “Somewhere Over the Rainbow”.

JJ Fonne

I’m loving that Rey’s become proactive in different ways.  Life here has changed her.  It’s changed us all.  We’re happily ensconced in burgeoning careers and personal crusades.  My cousin and I have bonded.  Sure, we have our tiffs and life’s not always rosy, but I can’t complain about anything.  It may be a cliché saying, but it’s true:  it’s all good.  This is going to sound cheesy, but my quintessential song is “Tiny Bubbles” by Hawaiian pop icon Don Ho.  (Even if I sound like sound like a frog that’s barely been missed being run over by pick-up truck, I have no prob singing his signature song in the shower—with absolute gusto.)

Linda Royale

Contrary to what JJ’s posted, I can’t say I’ve changed a lot since moving here, but I’m certainly grateful and count my blessings for having the opportunity to live and work here.  I have to confess, when Rey suggested becoming professional private investigators, I didn’t take her seriously.  In fact, I humored her—for weeks.  When it became obvious she was totally serious, I attempted to talk her out of it.  But she’s strong-minded, among other things, so P.I.s it was.  I don’t regret it.  At all.  As for Hawaii, the aloha spirit does exist—it’s almost tangible—and it’s infectious.  And on that note, my quintessential song is Bruno Mars’ “Uptown Funk/Formation”.  Talk about infectious.  It makes me want to dance every time.  . . . And maybe, just maybe, it will “up” The Boss’ “funk”.

Aloha from Rey, JJ, and Linda!

Aloooooooooooooooooooooo-hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhha

Some folks have asked why the three of us decided to set up shop on Oahu, considering the three of us had never even been to the Islands.

It was my idea.  Just like I thought up the name The Triple Threat Investigation Agency.  JJ never liked it and Linda wasn’t crazy about it, but they agreed to it regardless.  Gotta love those two.

Every state has different “rules” about how to set up private eye shingles.  Bearing that in mind—okay, okay, finding out the hard way—I sorta pointed a finger at a map and Hawaii it was.

I don’t think any one of us regrets the move: we love the Aloha State.  Agency and careers aside, there’s so much to embrace:

  • balmy trade winds that tickle all over (and keep the sweat at bay)
  • shopping outlets and malls that never disappoint
  • subtle lingering scents like sweet plumeria and briny ocean air that envelop like soft silk
  • positive energy and vibes that boost optimism and hope
  • vast and vibrant colors that seem surreal sometimes
  • amazing rainbows (galore!)
  • stunning landscapes and seascapes
  • food trucks and kiosks and restaurants in abundance
  • shopping outlets and malls that never disappoint . . . oh, I mentioned that already, didn’t I? . . . but they are awesome.

The list goes on.  And never mind the countless things to do, like sunrise runs and jogs (not this gal’s cup o’ tea), walks along the beach, festivals and parades, and nummy Mai-Tais and . . . yeah, we really love Hawaii.

Just as we love our P.I. lives.  If you’re ever in Chinatown, drop by the agency (we’re not shy).

˜ A haupia-sweet aloha from yours truly (Rey).  ˜

2nd Logo