About Me, Us, You, Whatever – by Reynalda-Fonne Werde (Post Writer Extraordinaire)

Hey there.  I’m back for another post.  Last time, I gave some advice re professional email addresses.  JJ and Linda said I’d done a pretty decent job for someone who’s not a fan of writing.  But as I may have mentioned, I’m kinda getting to like it.  (And, between you and me, I think I’m better than “decent”.)

We’re updating The Triple Threat Investigation Agency website and blog to look and read more professional.  Linda’s gotten agency emails in motion and JJ’s revamping the “About Us” page.  It’s nice enough, but not great.  So this post’s about doing a dynamite one based on what we learned from fellow P.I.s and successful local business folks.

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Have some strategically placed photos relevant to your business; this will break up and balance the “About” page.  The word back when: eye candy.  You want that page to be visually appealing and you don’t want word overload.

Tell visitors what you do and what makes you qualified to do it.  Cite a success or two.  You don’t have to write an essay.  Be short and sweet.  A paragraph is fine.

Communicate enthusiasm for what you do and why you do it.  Ditto re the short and sweet.

Mention professional (and possibly personal, depending on what you’re “about”) successes.  Success for the Triple Threat Investigation Agency: solving a murder case and, on a more everyday note, locating a lost pooch.

Disclose what it is you want to (can) do.  For the agency: handle all types of investigations with utmost discretion.

Have a sentence or phrase or two expressing the spirit and/or purpose of your business.  Place them, like your photos, strategically on the “About Me” / “About Us” page.  Grab attention.  This one I’m just throwing out and it’s probably not too original, but given we’re a P.I. agency, we might state something like: “No Case Too Big or Too Small.”  You got the idea.

Contact info in a corner (in addition to an actual Contact Page) is something worth adding.  Make it super easy (accessible) for people to contact you.

You could also provide a personal message.  Again, keep it brief.

Feel free to include links—to articles, posts, reviews, your email address.  Determine what’s important/relevant and do it.

A couple of additional things to consider when you’re putting it together is how you’re going to write it (first person or third) and what type of tone you’ll use (humorous versus serious).  Make sure it reflects you / your business.

Hopefully, I’ve given some solid advice for that “About” page.  The Boss is back next week, as an FYI.  And I’m off to the spa now (nothing better than a facial and massage to get yourself feeling like a million dollars).

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Aloha!