When the Post, Page and/or Mind Proves Blank

Literally.

. . . I’d touched upon this way back when but, you know, it never hurts to re-address an issue or snag.  For those of you who are bloggers and writers, you’ve all experienced it—yup, the dreaded writer’s block.

The Free Dictionary (my personal fave) defines that annoying little impediment as “a usually temporary psychological inability to begin or continue work on a piece of writing”.

In truth, I’m not so sure if it’s this that I’m experiencing—it’s more like hmm, what do I really want to post about today?  Blog promotion (something I desperately need to do)?  Ads and selling (something I urgently need to do)?  Attracting more followers (something I seriously need to do)?  Ensuring the Triple Threat Investigation Agency gals don’t fall to the wayside (something I must continue to do)?  Venting about my personal life, like the <bleeping> full-time job I wish I could ditch, because blogging and writing full-time would be a dream come true!?  The possibilities are truly endless.

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If there’s an overabundance of ideas, it probably wouldn’t hurt to put them in a hat and pick one.  It’d be like a game, a challenge: here’s the topic, now run with it!  Yeah, I like that.  Works for me.  <LOL>

If there’s a big blank canvas where the old gray matter usually sits, then one or more of the following options are doable (a few quick ideas touched upon in past):

  • take a walk or go to the gym (both which I very much enjoy)
  • read a book or mag
  • be creative (draw or paint, knit or sew, or do something equally imaginative/productive)
  • pop into a corner coffee shop for a boost of caffeine and change of venue
  • call or email a friend; talk about where and why you’re stuck or exchange inventive ideas
  • listen to music
  • turn on the telly, but don’t get caught up in marathon viewing
  • jot down one-liner ideas/storylines (anything that pops to mind), and/or
  • write out a few of your favorite writer’s passages to get inspired.

So which one(s) am I going to do?  Take a walk, even if it is bone-chilling cold outside (knew those on-sale boots would eventually prove useful).  Finally pick up the latest Stephanie Plum from the to-read tray where, sadly, dust bunnies have morphed into bovines.

And if both fail, maybe I’ll just go smack my head against a wall (figuratively speaking, of course).

Happy writing, my friends.

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The Cover or A Cover-Up: Doing Indispensable Due Diligence

Continuing on the topic of book covers . . . as previously mentioned, you can employ a designer (spend a few dollar$) or do it gratis.  Your choice.

In the last post, I’d commented upon one site that had caught my eye and that if it was as awesome as I thought it might be, I’d share.  So return I did, with the intention of downloading constructive info and items to promote my next Triple Threat Investigation Agency novel, “Forever Poi”.

The first thing you see on the site is a variety of e-book cover templates.  Pick whichever one you like and continue.  Provide a little personal information and then select your cover image by uploading a file.  You receive a mock-up in your Inbox.  Easy-peasy.  Love it.

And what’s not to love about (and get excited over) the loads of complimentary stuff like tips and templates, and even an impressive-sounding media kit?  Everything appears to be—yes, can you spell it?  F-r-e-e.  Splendid!  But how can this be!?

It can’t.  <LMAO>  After browsing a wee while and requesting one of the free items, I was swept into a vid requesting $$ (not a lot, not a little) to acquire additional “valuable” material.  The actual download, once I managed to locate it (don’t ask), provided maybe one or two useful tips.  Maybe.

If you’re seeking to do a no-cost cover, or in quest of free author/writer assistance, please do that due diligence I constantly refer to.

Yes, most definitely, you can get a free cover—and a truly awesome one at that—but first get to know who and what you’re dealing.  Read reviews and appraisals.  Check out sites thoroughly.

Be(come) informed.  Learning doesn’t have to be a trial, so have some fun doing so.  The site that promised so much, but delivered very little, certainly provided me with a few chuckles.  <still LMAO>

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Do I or Don’t I . . . Create my Own Book Cover?

I believe we’re in agreement that people do judge books by their covers.  A crappy one’s not going to catch a potential purchaser’s eye, much less make a sale—unless the name on it is recognizable and has a solid following.

A vibrant, eye-catching cover is a must.  Do you pay someone to do it?  A good cover designer doesn’t have to cost much; there are definitely some out there.  You only need do your due diligence.  Ask around.  Get feedback.

Or maybe you do it yourself first, to get a feel for it—to acquire a creative [critical] eye, as it were—before you shell out a few $ to a professional.

. . . Or maybe you do it yourself, period.  A lot have—and successfully.  The cover for Odd Woman Out on Wattpad was designed by yours truly.  It was super simple to do with Canva and, quite frankly, I really like it (that I’ve seen it on another novel is quite beside the point).

Go to a few book cover design sites—many are free—and nose around.  Play a little.  Create a cover for the fun of it or a current project.  Design one that fits your genre and style.  Tweak it until you get it “just right”.

Elements to consider re your cover:

  • format (do you go with conventional or do you customize?)
  • genre or subject matter
  • artwork and photos (stock items or your own, or a combination?)
  • font and text
  • layout, and
  • colors/filters.

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The great thing about designing your own cover, particularly if you use “free” software, is that you can put the money you saved toward promotion and marketing/ads.

There are several amazing sites out there, too many to list in one post.  Nor do I want it to appear that I’m endorsing one over the other.  (There’s one, though, that caught my eye and I have to go back.  If I’m as impressed as I believe I’ll be, I may share that one with you in another post.)

In the meanwhile, snoop around.  Google “best e-book cover designers”, “free e-book covers”, “professional book covers”, and so forth.  Sure, it will take time, but consider it a viable investment in your future [sales].

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Judging a Book by Its Cover

“Forever Poi” should be completed in the New Year.  Fingers crossed.  So while I’m writing and rewriting—and huffing and puffing because I want to be there like yesterday—I’ve gotten the cover going.  (Katrina Joyner as an FYI does all my art.  She’s awesome, but that’s another post.)

So that brings me to this week’s Wednesday post: book covers.  What makes for a winning one?  Do you even need to have a good one (which can cost $$ if you’re not artistically inclined or aren’t sure who to hire or where to go)?

Let’s start with the obvious.  Yes, you really do need a dynamic cover—it’s what draws a potential reader (buyer).  A so-so/blah one isn’t going to convince someone your book is worth reading, much less purchasing . . . unless you have a name and following.  A so-so/blah one might also give the impression that the content is, well, equally so.  You don’t want to turn off the “shopper” before he/she even gets to the sample stage.

You’ve heard that expression: don’t judge a book by its cover.  Unfortunately, many do.  Bear that in [serious] mind.  Be professional—not only in your writing, but with the accompanying artwork.

Make sure your cover reflects your content.  If your “product” is a cozy mystery, you probably don’t want sexpots pirouetting with leather whips.  A vibrant appropriate cover will not only appeal to potential purchasers, but to those who might consider doing reviews or passing on recommendations.

Before you commit to making that cover “the” cover, get feedback.  Friends and family are fine, but you might want to ask others in the industry.  Join a supportive writing group like Facebook’s fantastic SPF Community.  I’ve seen many an author post their cover and ask for opinions—and receive valuable feedback.

Lastly, have that cover display a bit of you / your voice.  Think: branding.

Book cover software does have merit, so this weekend’s post will look at some “makers”.  Until then, have an awesome creative rest of the week.

2 Ps in a Pod: Perseverance & Patience

It was a toss-up whether to write about e-book covers or Odd Woman Out, the weekly-installment novel on Wattpad.

Odd Woman Out won.  Not because I’m attempting to shamelessly promote myself (something I actually suck at, big time), but simply because I’m in the mood to share.

For those unfamiliar with OWO, as I like to call it, it’s a “sorta” cross between mainstream fiction and chick-lit.

Alexia Raidho (Alex, as she prefers) searches for self and soul as she travels along a literal and cerebral journey.
Through diary entries and fiction writing, Alex reflects upon exploits, accomplishments and failures, and speculates whether she might be an “odd woman out”.  It certainly seems she doesn’t fit into the norm, whatever that norm may be.
Relationships, even those of a volatile and abusive nature, have impelled her down paths that may otherwise never have been taken.  All—gratefully, she’ll concede—have expanded her vision, talent, and maturity.

I began writing OWO a good 25 years ago—yeah, I know, some of you weren’t born then or were still tooting about on a tricycle.  <LOL>  Pretty much completed, into a drawer it went for several years and out it came late 2015.  How’s that for perseverance?

It’s funny-weird to see how you’ve developed as a writer over time.  I know I have, majorly.  This is good.  I’ve [finally] found my voice.  Yeah, there’s still room for improvement, and if there are another 25 years to come, then I imagine I’ll have developed even more.

The point of this post?  Persevere, my friends.  Do what you love.  Take your time and never rush (patience is a virtue, on so many levels).  Grow as a person; develop as an artist [whatever your medium].

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Here a Blog, There a Blog . . . but Who Has a G-R-E-A-T Blog?

Jay (James J. Cudney IV) that’s who.

If you’re thinking of starting a blog or have one going and are wondering how to make it more effective and successful, check out Jay’s 365 Daily Challenge / This is my Truth Now.

https://thisismytruthnow.com     https://jamesjcudney.com

Every day, he writes a post based upon a word.  Since March 2017, he’s posted “a characteristic either I currently embody or one I’d like to embody in the future.  365 days of reflection to discover who I am and what I want out of life”.  Love it!  Talk about focus (I yearn for the day I’m free of the 9-to-5 and can apply the same commitment).

I’ve been following Jay for a wee while and admire the energy and output.  (I have to ask: do you sleep, my friend?)  Not only does Jay have a cool and very well organized blog—clean and crisp, and easy to navigate—he has a debut novel (look for it on Amazon).

Watching Glass Shatter, which is a well-crafted, character-driven family saga, has been receiving a whack-load of fantastic reviews (I’m envious).  If you’re writing a book or plan to, check out his book/blog tour; this is the way to go.  Interviews, reviews, and giveaways are a definite must nowadays; he has these covered and then some.

Here’s to a successful tour, Jay . . . and to providing inspiration to fellow aspiring and established bloggers and writers.

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Authoring an Author Blog . . . or . . . Whadya Wanna Write About?

We’ve touched upon blogging, landing pages, editing, proofing, and the list goes on.  What we (okay, I) haven’t yet “discussed” is an author blog—like the one I’m attempting to master.

You’re an author/writer and you want to blog about it . . . share your projects and output with the world . . . make some $$$ at it (I know I would).  So, let’s center on that, shall we?

What makes for a good author blog?  One that’s constantly updated—it’s fresh, factual, and maybe even fun.  Success will be contingent upon three main factors:

  • frequency (of posting/updating)
  • interest component, and
  • what and how well you write (how you convey thoughts/ideas).

The writing world’s changed big-time since I first set out to become a published (successful/prosperous) writer.  That, obviously, has not [yet] occurred.   <LMAO>  The methods/mediums have transformed drastically.  Change is good; stagnation is not.  Self-promotion is a necessity while sitting back, hoping for the best, is a cop-out (unless making sales or attracting followers is neither here nor there).

I digress.  What type of author blog should you go for?  That’s entirely up to you.  Consider how much time you want (can) devote.  Can you post daily?  If not, then weekly?  How often are you able to update your blog?  Truly, you don’t want to be inactive for too long; you want to generate—and keep—interest.

Whether you post daily or weekly, make sure to write from your heart about what you love and know, and do so with sincerity and confidence.  Maybe you’re not Ernest Hemingway or Voltaire, but you are you: a unique entity with a unique voice.  Take pride in that.

What’s the focus of the author blog, besides selling yourself?  Will you keep a personal blog journal?  Discuss world events?  Start a writing community—maybe a genre-specific one?  Maybe you’d like to do reviews?  The sky’s the limit . . . to a point.  You want to stay on point and not diversify too much.

Take a look at what others are doing; you’ll surely acquire a notion or two that will get the gray matter percolating.  You may get so excited, you’ll decide to get involved in a blog tour (kinda like a book tour and equally fun).

The one thing that’s sure to come out of all this is that—besides perfecting the art of writing/posting—you’ll gain a whack-load of blogging knowledge.

. . . It really is all good, fellow author.  Now, get out there and show us your stuff!

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Life on Oahu Couldn’t Be Better

Rey here.  I’m taking over for the boss today.  She’s juggling time and tasks this week and keeps dropping the ball, but not necessarily coz she’s clumsy.  She’s just . . . time deficient, I think Linda might call it.

Speaking of, Linda’s taking a week of holidays and is heading to Maui tomorrow with a couple of surfer buddies.  No, there’s no romance brewing or anything like that.  She’s still off guys since her ex-boyfriend Makjo ran off with a bride last year.  At least she’s not making any more voodoo dolls; they were so creeping me out.

And speaking of boyfriends, JJ’s sailing with that “sometimes” boyfriend, Cash aka Richie J (undercover agent – drug dealer).  They have the weirdest relationship.  I don’t get it.  Come to that, I don’t think JJ gets it, either.  She’ll figure it out one day.  I hope.

Me?  I’m minding the agency today.  Have a few calls and emails to return.  We’re still wrapping up our latest project, the one we gals at The Triple Threat Investigation Agency have started calling The Forever Poi Case.  You’ll be able to read about it—if the boss can stop dropping those balls—come end of November.

I feel for her.  She’s got so many ideas, and so many dreams, but they’re not doable given her situation right now.  Let’s just keep the faith for her.

On this end, I can’t complain about a thing.  Life—and work—on Oahu is awesome.  I’m so-o glad we moved here.  Sure, things aren’t perfect, but nothing in life is.  We just accept things as they come and do the best . . . and, if necessary, juggle, juggle, juggle.  If one of those bleepin’ balls falls, we pick it up and start all over again.  It’s all good, JJ would say.  I totally concur.

Aloha!

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So You Wanna be a Scriptwriter?

I do.  I sort of am . . . or, rather, I used to be.  (Did a few for an existing company that has yet to make sales.  One day, perhaps.)

I’m actually writing one for a San-Fran based acquaintance.  Hence the post about scriptwriting, a deviation from the intended [continued] one about editing.  And yet, scriptwriting is all about editing, because you must use a limited number of pages to communicate to [effectually] detail action, mood, and dialog.

If you’re thinking of writing a script/screenplay, but are intimidated, don’t be.  There are some great programs out there to help.  I use Final Draft and have dabbled with Celtx.  Both are good and will enable you to conform to required criteria, including rules re physical format.  You can develop a professional-looking script—without breaking into a sweat or tirade.

Assuming we all know what a script entails, the first question will likely be: where to start?  Have a book, idea, story outline ready.  Or, if you’re feeling confident, do it from scratch (something already summarized or sketched makes it a trifle easier, but to each his/her own).

You’re not narrating a tale, but showing it.  A script involves visuals—you are documenting what the viewer is seeing and hearing.

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You want your audience to emphasize with your main character, to be drawn into the plot, to feel as if they are part of the action.  You also want conflict, which is integral to any story, on screen or off.  There should be some sort of struggle, be it physical or mental/emotional.

This is where I’m currently at: creating a logical struggle the protagonist must undergo before evolving into a true hero.  Writing a script is great fun.  It’s challenging, sure, because you do need to write your tale within a set number of pages, but descriptions and details abound.  The sky’s the limit.  You just need to utilize your creative noodle.  How fun is that?!

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