The Beginnings of E-book Nirvana

Maybe first and foremost let’s decide how to spell that?  Ebook, e-book, or E-Book?  Methinks e-book (coz it works for l’il ol’ me.)

The two main types of publishing—e-book versus traditional—have been touched upon in previous posts.  Now, how about actually writing one?

It’s something you’ve thought and dreamed about, but haven’t yet done.  Check a reason:

  • lassoing time (it’s proven as difficult to snare as a rampaging bull)
  • picking a genre from a cornucopia of possibilities (mystery? romance? western? steampunk?!)
  • deciding between fiction or nonfiction (do I create exploits for crazy characters or advise others on how to construct cuckoo clocks?)
  • settling on a story, plot, and/or focus (huh? uh?)
  • getting <bleeping> started when you’re <bleeping> unsure what to do, and/or
  • other: ____________ (you fill in the blank).

Now that you’ve recognized why you haven’t written one, you can kiss off the reason(s) and move forward, and actually start writing.

Awesome. You’ve got an idea—a tale (or teachings) screaming to be shared!  Go for it.  Put the pedal to the metal, or fingers to the keyboard.  Pen to paper [still] works, too.

Before beginning your chef-d’œuvre, it might be best to determine:

  • where you’re going to write: distractions (pets, kids, partners, coworkers, outdoor views) should be at a minimum, unless you possess superhero skill at blocking out all
  • when you’re going to write; sticking to set schedules is about as easy leaping tall buildings, but figure out the best time of day/night to sit down and then do it.

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If the plan is to write fiction, check out authors writing in your genre.  If it’s nonfiction, research websites and blogs, and authors, centering on the same or similar topic.

Read some e-books in your given genre.  See what’s out there and what’s popular.

Do research before or while you write, or after the first draft (whatever works best for you).  Check facts and stats, settings and locales.  There’s nothing worse than glaring errors (like a famous institution located in the wrong part of town, or a misspelled product or place).

When working on your first draft, try not to worry too much about grammar or typos, logistics or continuity.  Just go with the flow.  Get it all down, then clean up (e-d-i-t).

You may want to do an outline before you start writing.  Some writers do, some (like me) don’t so, again, do what works for you.  You’ll figure it out.

Now, if you’ve got a blog going, consider engaging your viewers and visitors.  Let them know what you’re up to.  Maybe you’d like to request their input?

When that final edit is complete, take a deep breath, and pat yourself [profusely] on the back.  Find an e-publisher and show [off] your baby to the world!

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Landing a Landing Page

Recently, we touched upon setting up a blog.  Now, what about a landing page?  (To be honest, I’d not much considered it until a few articles and “chats” fell into my lap last week.)

What’s a landing page, you may wonder.  It’s a single [unique] web page on your website.  Sometimes called a destination page or lead-capture page, that’s exactly what it does: it leads a visitor or viewer to you, it “captures” his/her attention.  It’s either aimed at the intended promotion of a company, product or service, or to inform a viewer of something.

There are actually two types: Click Through and Lead Generation (the aforementioned lead-capture page).

  • The former encourages a visitor to click through to another page . . . motivating him/her [hopefully] to make a decision about buying something, and then filling that shopping cart.
  • The latter is used to obtain user info, like names and email addresses. Usually, the signer-upper will get something in return—such as regular blog posts, vouchers, discounts, free trials, demos, and gifts (among many other things).

Is a landing page really necessary, you may also wonder.  Yeah, it is . . . if you want to increase your visitor-to-lead conversion rates.  Because, yeah, you want to capture leads!

Leads = data.  Data = insight.  Insight = progress.  Progress = success.

Apparently, they’re fun and easy to use.  I li-ike that, because those familiar with me know I can suck when it comes to anything technical—just ask me about that elusive [much dreamed of] mailing list.  <LMAO>

When you decide to design a landing page, write and create it with one business objective in mind.  What is it you’re trying to “market”?

As I always say, ad nauseam I know, do your due diligence.  There’s tons of information out there on landing pages.  And there are some awesome sites that offer great ideas.

Now, I’m not endorsing these, but if you’re interested in learning about landing pages, here are three sites you may want to visit.

Instapage has reviewed 100 landing pages, and offers pros and cons of why they work (or don’t).  Worth checking out!

https://instapage.com/blog/landing-page-examples

Unbounce has “The Landing Page Conversion Course”.  Find it at:

http://do.thelandingpagecourse.com.

One Page Love (“the ultimate showcase of One Page websites”) has some interesting deals and free templates.  For a nominal fee, you can also get a critique of your “one-pager”.  (I have to confess, I really like the comfy, easy-going feel of this site and may just—once I get my own landing page created—have them take a gander.)

https://onepagelove.com/gallery/landing-page

Happy landings!

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Bloggin’ Bonanza

Have we touched upon actually starting a blog?  Methinks maybe not.  So-o, let’s give it some thought.

Why have your own blog?

  • Coz it’s a great way to share thoughts, ideas, reviews—the sky’s the limit!  It puts you out there: you can shine like a star.
  • Coz it can prove a bonanza (not the show, but the jackpot).  It can serve as a fabulous way of generating income (personally, I’m still figuring that out on this end, but it’s a definite objective down the blogging road).

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For those not yet blogging, but giving it serious consideration, you may want to start with some basic background/information gathering.  But that said, why not simply jump in and learn as you go?  I more or less did.  The only thing I did before setting up A Writer’s Grab-Bag was to determine which blog-publishing service / platform to use.  A lot of people had great things to say about WordPress, so WordPress it was; you choose the one that feels right for you.

Happy news for those counting nickels (like I seem to perpetually be)—a blog can be set up and designed for free.  It depends on who you go with and what options and type of reach you’re contemplating . . . and what you’re willing to do without.

Remember, though:  free = limitations.

Decide whether you want a selfhosted blog or hosted one.  The former resides on your own server.  Most people generally, however, go for the latter and pay a third-party to host their blogThis allows for a lot of benefits: a more professional appearance, additional bandwidth and memory, and control over your blog in terms of layout and SEO, among other things.  If you go with a hosted blog, yes, you will have to put out a few of those nickels.  The good thing, though, is you get to focus on your posting and not worry about configuring and all that annoying technical sh-uh-stuff.

Figure out your domain name; think of something catchy, easy to recall, and indicative of your blog.

Part of the fun is designing the blog.  The scheme and layout options are endless!  Feeling daunted, unsure?  Check out blogs that cater to the audience you want to attract.   Scrutinize successful ones.  Research ideas.  Then go for it.  Design one that reflects you and your blog content.  Add those bells and whistles!  You can do it.

Enough food for thought?  Methinks likely not.  But perhaps sufficient enough for you to take the plunge into the blogging foray.  Just bear in mind: there’s a ton (!) of resources out there for beginner/novice bloggers (which I still am), including support groups and communities.  You don’t have to go it alone . . . but you should definitely go for it!

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! Time to Get Motivated !

Let’s find ways of getting motivated—to move beyond fear’s stagnation, battle a lack of confidence, quell a bout of ennui, or whatever it is that’s tethering us in place with super-thick bungee cords.

Where to start?  By un-tethering those cords and determining what needs doing.  What’s the goal or objective?  Mine: to create an extensive mailing list, have a recognizable name and successful blog, to assist fellow writers, and maybe offer editing advice and/or services.  That’s a lot to accomplish with limited time; in fact, that’s a lot to accomplish in any span, period.  The logical thing to do then is focus on one objective at a time.  For me, the mailing list is an excellent one to begin with.  As such, I should learn all I can about what makes a successful one and then apply that knowledge.

Having an objective is one thing; being motivated (enthused, stimulated) to make it happen is equally important.  Viewing the works/products of others (in my case, successful authors) will provide creative ideas.  Seeing their achievements will offer encouragement.

Having a timeframe is a great idea: set one that’s realistic.  As the saying goes, Rome wasn’t built in a day; so don’t decide to accomplish your goal in 24 hours.  You may want to post about it or simply stick a reminder on your fridge: keep the intent [and wished-for outcome] readily in view and accessible.

You may have a few hours, or days, where motivation just ain’t happening.  That’s okay.  It’s like writer’s block: a temporary time-out.  Don’t fret and don’t give up.  It will come.  Keep the faith.

If necessary, find inspiration.  Read inspirational quotes, watch a persuasive thought-provoking video, talk to a friend, join an on-line community (you’d be amazed how many offer valuable support and advice).  Or maybe take a long walk, get some [relatively] fresh air, and un-jumble thoughts.

Stop finding excuses.  <ROTFL>  I have a great [true] one—that lack of time.  But, at the end of the day, it’s exactly that: a X*&!%$ excuse (so here’s a kick in the butt to myself).  If there are only 30 minutes of “personal” time per day, make the most of them: read, learn, absorb, apply!

Sure, some tasks aren’t that pleasurable, but they need to get done.  So focus on the components of the goal that are fun and run with them.  The rest will fall into place.  Once you’ve discovered enough external motivation, realize it internally.  It’s there and it’s in you.  You’ve got what it takes.

Baby steps are something I’ve referred to in Typepad posts—how those teeny-tiny strides may seem like they’re not progressing us too quickly or very far, but the fact of the matter is they are.  Moving slowly is actually a good thing: it allows us time to absorb and assimilate (kinda like Star Trek Borgs, but in a positive way).

These are but a few off-the-cuff ideas to get going.  I could offer more, but this is a post, not a dissertation.  . . . That said (speaking of goals), one day there’ll be a deck or vid on this blog.  In fact, there’ll be a few.  <LOA>  But one baby step at a time, my friends.  One baby step—and goal—at a time.

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Getting Motivated . . . or . . . Finding that Elusive Mojo

There’s [still-lllllllllllllllllll] a knee-high heap of articles and emails to read re getting a mailing list going, attracting viewers/followers, and making big bucks.  Should I laugh or weep?

It’s kinda like suffering from writer’s block—you’re stuck, determining what direction to take, what to do first, and who to attract.  The thing about becoming motivated is that you may already be completing or accomplishing things, but you’re just not quite focused or informed enough to impel yourself that little bit further.

Or you may have a comfortable routine that suits your needs.  There’s no need to learn more; you just continue doing what you’re doing.  <pointing finger at moi>

Every day, I whip up a brief Facebook post for my Triple Threat private-eye gals.  I’ll add a little pic, maybe an emoji.  Voilà!  Every Wednesday and Saturday, I create a WordPress post or page related to writing or my lovely lady detectives.  Voilà!  Damn, I’m good.  And let’s not forget that Typepad blog that no one visits; there’s a weekly post there, too.  Damn, I’m really good.

. . . Not really<LMAO>  I haven’t motivated myself to learn [more] about—or apply—those [%!@!] mailing lists I post about.  No ifs or buts: they’re vital to success.  As such, I can hardly question, or grumble about, why I’ve not attracted more than a couple of followers.  My [really] bad.

But, in deference to self, it’s a question of time, too.  There’s very little of it in my current life (given a full-time job and taking care of Mom), so I apply it where I can: posting and writing.  If I don’t do either, then I’m a non-entity.  But if I don’t promote/market, then I’m a non-entity, too.

LMAO again.  The intention had been to post about motivation and I’ve gone off on a bit of a tangent about myself.  Look for “Part 2” next week on tips/strategies for you [us] to get motivated and inspired.  Let’s locate that elusive mojo!

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Calling All Writers & Bloggers!

There’s [still] a knee-high pile of articles and emails to plow through re getting a mailing list going, attracting viewers/followers, and making big bucks.  <LMAO>  It sounds so f’g easy.  And, for some, I don’t doubt that it is.  God bless you that have it easy.

As one of the “missions” of this blog is to share information gleaned, I thought I’d touch upon that valuable marketing tool called the “Call to Action Button” (CTA).

It has a plethora of purposes—like getting readers to sign up for your mailing list, subscribing to your blog/website, leading them to your shop, or purchasing a product or service.  You can use these CTAs in posts or add them to a sidebar.  Whatever it is you want your visitor or viewer to do, make sure you have one.  But before you design one, ask yourself this: “what’s the goal of my blog (website)”?

There’s a ton of stuff to be learned about this lovely little tool; given this is a post and not a page or in-depth PDF doc, here are a few highlights (which I’ll apply to mine, when I finally apply a CTA to this blog—and I will).

Make it clear/uncomplicated.  Your visitor should be drawn to it almost immediately.  Let it stand out from the bordering content, so watch what’s around it.  Also, keep an eye on the size of your button.  Too small and it’ll be lost; too big and it’ll take over the screen.

Fun fonts are just that—fun, far-out, and frivolous—but make sure they’re readable.  Keep your lovely call-to-action short and sweet.  Create a sense of urgency, if doable.  Consider words like: “try”, “buy”, “sign up”, “get”, “join”, “start”, and “send” to name but a few (“free” is a pretty good one, too).  Get personal, as well: use “you” and “me”.

Offer a reason (or two) why your visitor should complete your CTA.  And don’t overwhelm him or her by offering too many actions or options.

You can keep them rectangular, as most of them are, or you can opt for something different—circle, box, star, whatever you like.

Remember: while a CTA may look amazing, it may not generate action (i.e. convert traffic), so you’ll want to test it out.

In my Google travels, I came across a couple of free call-to-action button sites (and this is by no means an endorsement, simply a sharing of something found); I’ve not tried them.  You may want to check them out (like I plan to) to see where they take you.  But, like I always say: do your due diligence.  Learn what’s out there: absorb and apply . . . and have some fun, too.

http://buttonoptimizer.com

https://dabuttonfactory.com

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A Tale of Non-Success

Mr. X, a fictional character (or maybe not), and his foray into the publishing world make for some solid do’s and don’ts about doing just that: entering the intriguing, if not intimidating, writing world.

As a non-editor and non-researcher, Mr. X’s fiction writing leans towards the flat.  The ideas are sound; the execution not so much.  The gent has never seen any reason to edit his work or engage someone to do it, listen to opinions, or take advice.  Confidence is a very good thing; egoism probably not so much.

Not understanding why he couldn’t attract a traditional publisher or agent, Mr. X figured he go the self-publishing route—i.e. use a vanity (or subsidy) press.  Wouldn’t you know it?  He picked a press that has one of the worst reputations out there (we’ll be kind and keep it nameless).  As a non-researcher, he’d simply gone with whoever tickled his fancy.  (As an FYI, it took a good decade for him to discover his “publisher” had received a copious amount of bad press and wasn’t respected by legitimate publishers and agents.  Better late than never, as the saying goes.)

The point?  Do your due diligence.  And do it well.

Kudos to Mr. X, though, for strength of conviction.  He determined that his first book was so good, it should be made into a movie.  So, while penning a few more novels, he started chasing producers and directors, and agents.  Standard we’re-reviewing-your-submission replies were accepted as we’re-really-excited-to-have-your-amazing-stuff responses.  Humbleness is a good thing; arrogance maybe not so much.

In the [very] rare instance that someone requested more information or documentation, he complied . . . and advised where the requester could purchase his book(s).  This almost certainly is not a good thing, my friends.  When someone expresses interest, absorb the cost (consider it an investment) and provide a free copy or two.

Alas, another factor not in his favor: Mr. X didn’t (still doesn’t) care for social media.  As far as he’s concerned, it serves little merit as a promotion or marketing tool.  He’s certain he’ll succeed when “the time is right”.  This may be true, but after nearly 15 years, it seems evident that “the time has passed”.  He’s still not known and has no deals.  Playing ostrich by sticking your head in the sand and avoiding what’s out there—maybe because the truth is daunting or the amount of work/effort is overwhelming—is absolutely fine.  Keep believing you’ll “luck in”.  And, perhaps, you just may.

More conceivable?  You’ll experience success because you made it happen.

Do your due diligence.  And do it well.  We all love a tale with a happy [successful] ending.

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What’s in Tradition?

Traditional [fiction] publishing, that is.

Save for vanity publishing (something to avoid like picnic potato salad lying under a blazing summer sun all afternoon), at one time, the traditional publishing route was the only [viable] one to take.  It was tough—like hiking up Kilimanjaro when you’re a drive-to-the-corner kind of person.

Fortunately, the world of e-books arrived.  There’s a plethora (gotta love that word) of e-book publishers out there; Smashwords, Amazon’s KDP, Nook Press, and Kobo are to name a few.  You can format your work yourself, design the cover, and pretty much hold carte blanche, unlike in the traditional world where the publisher has creative control (never mind financial when you sign a binding contract).

Forgetting that [most] firms prefer to have agented writers contact them for potential representation—and that getting an agent is as difficult as getting a publisher—the odds of getting published are not in our favor.  Ever hear of the “slush pile”?

According to statistics, in 2013 only 50,000 novels were published; given the number written and submitted, the chances of being one of the “lucky ones” is slim.  As for agents, they tend to reject 99% of the projects received.  Not particularly encouraging, is it?  Rejection just plain sucks.

On a positive note, there’s tons of advice out there for both traditional and “e”, so read, read, read.  Determine what’s best for you.  You might even give the traditional route a try first—to get a feel for it and learn from the experience.

 E-books didn’t exist when I first started writing (I’m aging myself, alas).  For years, I tried acquiring an agent and publisher (whichever came first)—to no avail.  But I kept writing and gaining knowledge (and experience).  In retrospect, I see why I never got far: I had good ideas, but they weren’t executed well.  The great news?  I’ve improved—considerably so (pat on back to moi).

But this isn’t about me.  It’s about persevering, no matter which publishing route you take.  If you have a passion for writing, have at it!  Don’t second-guess yourself and don’t give up or in to fears and frustrations.

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Watt Fun

The merits of being a Wattpadder.

Is Wattpad a viable selling tool for an aspiring/established writer?  Maybe yes, maybe no.  Depends on who you talk to.  Some love it; some see it as no value add.

Currently, I have weekly installments of “Odd Woman Out” going.  Not sure anyone reads them.  But then, I’m not promoting them, either.  I guess I’m hoping a Wattpad fairy will sprinkle magic pixie dust.  Et voilà!  Tyler, you’re a hit!

The truth is that I’ve got an hour or so of actual “me” time per day, so it’s a toss of the coin.  Heads, I write; tails, I promote.  But if I promote, I need to decide what the best course of action is.  The abundance of self-promotion/marketing info out there is overwhelming.  It definitely takes (me) lots of time to digest all that requires doing.  And it seems easy enough initially . . . but three hours later, there I am, still trying to figure it out.

I digress.  For those not yet familiar with Wattpad, it’s a site with an informative blog and community (and labs) where—among many other things—writers can post works or persons can reach out with causes.  More notably, you can read Wattpad writers’—or Wattpadders’—opuses.  There’s lots of great stuff to be found.

From a writer’s perspective (forgetting the fact an audience or fanbase is probably a very good thing), I do find it rather fun.  You can design your own cover if you wish (I did mine and it ain’t bad, if I do say so).  You can post as often as you like, but doing so regularly (frequently) would be best.  There’s something exciting about hitting “Create” and “Continue Writing”.  Maybe one day the commitment will pay off.  Maybe not.  It’s all good, whatever the outcome.

I hear Wattpad even has awards, though I confess I’ve not yet checked that out (I’ll add this to the 105 other must-dos).

Take a gander . . . and have some fun.

www.wattpad.com

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Burbling a Blurb – What’s in a Written Sales Pitch?

Remember: you want to create interest, if not excitement.  Suck in your reader.  Do that by revealing the dilemma or challenge facing your character(s) without disclosing how it’s resolved. 

Finding the right [amount of] words to sell your beloved work isn’t always easy.  No question, writing book blurbs—otherwise known as sales pitches or selling tools—can be challenging.  But, rest assured, it’s far from impossible.

Let’s consider what you shouldn’t do first:

  • go on incessantly, revealing all
  • reveal all (yeah, it’s a great story and you want to [enthusiastically] share every detail, but this really isn’t beneficial)
  • summarize all plot twists and/or characters
  • tell how the story ends
  • talk about how brilliant you and/or the story is
  • be overly effusive with descriptions (but not use effective descriptive words to entice us).

Now, let’s take into account what you should do:

  • tell us the genre of your book (we don’t want to have to guess, although mysteries do have their merit)
  • write a killer opening sentence; pull in your reader immediately
  • have us wanting to know/learn more
  • apply that old and familiar phrase: keep it short and sweet
  • introduce the protagonist and his/her quest, quandary, desire, journey (whatever the trial may be)
  • give a sense of setting.

My own process: write a synopsis (five to seven pages).  From that, whittle it to a one-page synopsis.  The blurb evolves from that.  Yeah, it can prove time-consuming.  But it helps capture the true essence of the book and, sometimes, it even reveals a snag.

Your process could be totally different.  Discover what works for you.  If you’re a first-time “blurber”, check out blurbs in your genre.  Get a feel for how they flow.  Adopt that rhythm.

Here’s a quick example (using my mystery series trio):

 The gals from the Triple Threat Investigation Agency stumble across a body in Ala Moana Park while waiting for a new client.  Could it be, this was he—Jake the Flake?  Why did someone of his notorious background want to hire them?  The assault he’d recently been arrested for?  Or the stalker he’d briefly mentioned on the phone?  As JJ, Rey and Linda search for clues across various Hawaiian Islands, it’s apparent a number of people hated the toady guy enough to want him dead.  And when their quest drags them into the dark and dangerous underground gambling world, they learn they’d better push out fast . . . before they add to the mounting body count.

Remember: you want to create interest, if not excitement.  Suck in your reader.  Do that by revealing the dilemma or challenge facing your character(s) without disclosing how it’s resolved.

It takes practice, like anything, but it does come—and when it does, your awesome blurbs will attract readers (and followers) and help you make sales.

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