Review: The Scarlet Queen by Sean Robins

It’s time for another Sean Robins review.  Our prolific writer has penned another book, The Scarlet Queen, the prequel to the well-received The Crimson Deathbringer series.  This time, we follow beautiful Xornaa, a “femme fatale mercenary”—and Xortaag spy—who becomes involved in time traveling with the intriguing if not unique Klatzo, creator of the time machine.  In addition to (expected and desired) engaging battles, there are more life-saving episodes (but no spoiler alerts as to outcomes).

There are references to characters from the series (like Tarq the impassioned prankster and Maada the dogged general), which bring back welcome memories of those other exhilarating stories and danger-fraught and oft crazy adventures.

Here’s a little taste:

Up until then, I still had a faint hope that we could make it to the jump point, but it evaporated with the arrival of the new enemy ships. I closed my eyes, let out a long low sigh, and covered my face in defeat. The thought that everything I’d done, including inventing a freaking time machine, had been for naught stabbed at my heart.

I clenched my fist so tightly that my hands started shaking as a vein began to pulse in my forehead. Then I heard my doppelgangers shouting in excitement. I looked at my tactical display and, in sheer astonishment, realized the new ships were shooting at their own space fighters.

I blinked and checked my tactical display again to make sure my eyes weren’t deceiving me. Nope. It was real.

Two of the pursuing space fighters were hit before their pilots realized what was happening. The other two broke and flew in opposite directions, but each had three vessels on their six, and I was certain even their pilots knew they were doomed. They threw their space fighters up and down, left and right, and tried to avoid the incoming fire, but they joined their dead comrades in less than two minutes.

What the hell is going on?!

What the hell indeed?  You’ll just have to read The Scarlet Queen to discover what happens!

For those not yet familiar with Sean, he’s a huge fan of Marvel, Game of Thrones, Star Wars, and Star Trek.  He’s also a university/college level English teacher who has lived and worked in different countries.  To find out more, please check out Sean and his new book out at:

Amazon:  https://www.amazon.ca/Scarlet-Queen-Adventure-Crimson-Deathbringer-ebook/dp/B091FMTSX4/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=the+scarlet+queen&qid=1625919260&s=books&sr=1-1

Twitter:  @seanrobins300

Facebook:  facebook.com/seanrobins300

Goodreads:  https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/18999889.Sean_Robins

Rating: lei1forbookreviewslei1forbookreviewslei1forbookreviewslei1forbookreviews

Review: The Silver Timeship by Sean Robins (The Crimson Deathbringer Series Book 4)

Sean Robin’s heroes and principals are back—Jim, Kurt, Xorgaana, Maada, Tarq—to save the universe before it’s too late!  Can they <shiver, shudder, gasp> do it?

They can if Jim, the ego-heavy protagonist, has anything to say about it—once he gets through licking his wounds, of course.  Kurt, Jim’s best friend, has no qualms about assisting.  Stunning, mind-reading Xornaa’s all in; so are prankster Tarq and former nemesis, General Maada.  And we have a sharp-witted newcomer, the beautiful Benedita, who flies a silver timeship (thus adding an interesting dimension, in more ways than one).

For the first time in a very, very long while, Benedita allowed herself to hope. Jim, Tarq, Maada, Kurt, and Xornaa were legends (especially Maada, that man was an apex predator). Together, they’d defeated the Volts, and they would go on to overcome more sinister threats in the future. If anyone could stop the Ghost Fleet, it was them. She might be able to pull this off, after all, which meant Diogo, Bia and Belinha wouldn’t die a horrible death. Of course, without the Time Engine, she was trapped here and would never see them again, but just knowing that they’d be alive and well was enough.

An odd array of “soldiers”, they set off to set things right.  En route, they encounter a sundry of curious characters, including Mother, an AI who turns out to be anything but maternal.  You want to talk about a run for your money, er, life, er . . .

The fourth in the Crimson Deathbringer series, The Silver Timeship, delivers . . . action, drama (of several sorts), and the usual wackiness.  There are a few nail-biting battles, where it appears that victory—and the fate of the illustrious universe—might belong to either side.

Overall, The Silver Timeship is a fun ride.  You’ll not want to put down the book until you know the outcome: did they or didn’t they?

A definite 4 out of 5.

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And, just so you fans are aware, coming in the not-too-distant future (but who really knows what “future” entails when time travel’s involved), is The Scarlet Queen.  It’s a prequel and features a few of your favorite characters’ adventures before the Xortaag invasion of Earth. There will also be one called The White Republic, but I’ll leave you with a bit of mystery as to what that one entails.

You can find Sean Robins on Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/Sean-Robins) and Twitter (@seanrobins300) and Facebook (facebook.com/seanrobins300).

seanabcFor those not yet familiar with Sean, he is a huge fan of Marvel, Game of ThronesStar Wars and Star Trek.  He’s also a university/college level English teacher who has lived and worked in five different countries( like Canada, eh?).  He’s met people from all around the world, and his parents and wife are from different backgrounds—hence, diversity as a major theme in his novels.

Becoming Bulletproof – Part 2

Per the previous post, I wanted to share a [sort of] review of a book—Becoming Bulletproof by Evy Poumpouras—one I’d label both enlightening and engaging.

As mentioned, it was given to me by a friend who understands what “space/place” I’m in these days and thought it might serve of value.  It has, as it’s certainly giving me food for thought.

Besides giving us a bit of background as to how she became a Secret Service Agent, and what that entailed, Evy provides guidance on how to “protect yourself / read people / influence situations / live fearlessly / become bulletproof” (per the back of the book jacket).  Sounds good—is good.

Divided into three sections/parts, we have “Protection”, “Reading People”, and “Influence”.

There are, for example, three types of fear: flight, fight, freeze.  I tend to embrace fight mode, though on the odd occasion, I might freeze.  Speaking of fight, you’ll find information on how to learn to fight; i.e. know your limitations, have a plan, maintain a reality check.

What else might you learn?  How to better secure your life.  “Whether at home, online, or out in public, you’ll have the strategies you need to keep your property, possessions, and information safe.”  Who doesn’t want to know how to do that?

I particularly liked Part Two, with chapters on how to read people, via diagrams as well as descriptions, and how to determine what people are truly saying, via verbal red flags.

As well as being enlightening and engaging, Becoming Bulletproof is a good, solid, straightforward read.  Need I say more?

Review: THE BLACK FLEET – The Crimson Deathbringer Book Three (Sean Robins)

The third book in the series, The Black Fleet, continues to satisfy.  It’s not quite as complex perhaps as the previous two (The Crimson Deathbringer and The Golden Viper), but it still delivers—with brisk action, campy humor, and the crazy cast we’ve grown so fond of.  They abound with zealousness (or is that insanity?).  The threat this time deals with the fate of the future.  Scary!

There’s protagonist Major Jim Harrison—with new wife, Ella, a career military woman—and his nemesis/alter-ego, Venom.  Jim’s still an ace fighter pilot but is also the author of well-selling autobiographies; not only have they granted him a certain level of fame but have bolstered an ego that was rather big to begin with.  Comrade Kurt returns, as does prankster Tarq, but the “insect” seems a little less dynamic than previously.  General Maada takes a pivotal role and gives Jim a run for his money, er, space fighter, er . . . .

Sean’s characters are well crafted and alternative planets and lifeforms—like the Akakies, Volts, and Talgonians—are thoroughly detailed.  It’s easy to visualize the action in all its explosive fervor.  Energy and danger overflow as heroes/heroines and enemies engage in thrilling skirmishes.

I looked at Earth, visible from the front window, and admired its magnificent beauty for the thousandth time. No matter how often I saw Earth from orbit, this view always made my breath catch and my spirit lift. My planet, where all my loved ones lived, including my unborn child. In this wide universe, this was the only place I called home, which incidentally I’d helped save a couple of times, along with the rest of the galaxy.

If pride really were a deadly sin, then I was going straight to hell.

And now new baddies were coming for her. Well, guess who was standing in their way. But first, there was a minor issue I had to deal with.

“You know what, Tarq?” I said conversationally. “It’s just occurred to me you never answered for the seven hundred million humans you got killed.

Another thrilling ride to be sure, one that leaves you longing for another.  Lucky us—there’s a fourth one to come.

A definite 4 out of 5!

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What about Sean Robins?  As may be evident from the Crimson Deathbringer books, he’s a huge fan of Marvel, Game of Thrones, Star Wars and Star Trek.  He’s a university/college-level English teacher and has lived and worked in six different countries, including Canada.  Sean has met people from all around the world, which is “probably why my characters look like the bridge crew from Star Trek”.

His favorite author is Jim Butcher (The Dresden Files), which is why he ended up writing in first-person POV with the same light-hearted, funny tone.  The fact that his MC’s name is Jim is purely coincidental, and has nothing to do with Captain James Kirk either.

Please check Sean out on Amazon, Goodreads, Twitter (@seanrobins300) and/or Facebook (facebook.com/seanrobins300).

Review: Fishnets and Fire-Eating: A True Story (A Dancer’s Diary in Japan)

WPMicheleold1useMy reading frenzy has calmed, but I did have the pleasure of reading Michele E. Northwood’s most entertaining sequel to Fishnets in the Far East: A Dancer’s Diary in Korea.  Like the first [personal account] book, the narrative in Fishnets and Fire-Eating: A True Story (A Dancer’s Diary in Japan) is humorous, exciting, and even edifying.

Fire-Eating is an absorbing story, another can’t-put-down read.  This time, we follow the “antics” of Michele and three other young women—performers—who travel to Hokkaido to entertain Japanese audiences with their dancing, acrobatics and, yes, fire-eating.

The quartet—Michele, Rachael, Anna, and Claire—encounter a plethora of interesting (if not off-putting) people, sex-crazed men, Yakuza henchmen and chiefs, Nutty Nora, and a crowbar-wielding fellow who has undergone shock therapy.

The appealing storyline also provides wonderful descriptions of culture and customs, locales and history.  Japanese words and phrases, interspersed throughout, make us yearn to learn a few more while photos supply we-are-there visuals.

As is human nature when people live together for an extended period, tension and friction (jealousy and envy) rear their unpleasant heads, adding to the women’s various dilemmas.  They do manage to work their way through the assorted conflicts, however, though not always well or easily.

One night, not long after they arrive, the women “consult” a Ouija board; spirits appear and impart ominous premonitions/messages.  Bizarrely, if not frighteningly, they start to come true.

Michele2use1As in Far East, Michele and her colleagues are not paid well; someone appears to be skimming their wages.  Still, despite many challenges, they persevere and life (eating/working) doesn’t seem quite as desperate as it did when Michele was in Korea.

I so enjoyed Fire-Eating, maybe even a little more than Far East; I have to give it 5 out of 5.

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For those not familiar with Michele, she’s quite amazing/accomplished.  Not only was she a dancer, she was a magician and fire-eater who toured the world for 20+ years in theater, musicals and the circus.  She has also been featured in the Guinness Book of Records; during her years in entertainment she was part of the world’s largest Human Mobile while working for the Circus of Horrors as their first “girl inside a bottle”.  Other fascinating jobs included working as a knife thrower’s assistant, assisting a midget in his balancing act, and taking part in a Scorpions’ concert grand finale.

Upon retiring from the exciting world of entertainment, she returned to school and acquired a First-Class Honors degree in Modern Languages (English and Spanish).

Michele currently lives in Spain with her Spanish husband, Randy, two dogs and two cats, and serves as an English teacher.  She loves living in the countryside with views of the sea and enjoys sitting on the terrace at the end of a long day, looking at the stars and contemplating (sounds divine).

Please check her and her books out at: https://www.amazon.com/Michele-E.-Northwood.

Alo—Ha—Waiiii Once More

The posting assignment from Boss Lady, also known as my BFF Rey, was pushed to the wayside a wee while back, but she was quick to remind me yesterday that we—she and I—hadn’t yet posted about our favorite Hawaiian author or Hawaiian-themed story.  In case you’re not familiar with us (the P.I.s from the Triple Threat Investigation Agency), I’m Linda.  Unlike Rey, I do read—huh?  Oh, sorry Sunshine.

I decided to go with Matthew Kaopio’s Written in the Sky, penned about a decade ago.  It’s a gritty, intense tale—YA, interestingly enough—that revolves around young Ikauikalani, or ‘Ikau, a fourteen-year-old who resides among the Ala Moana Park homeless.  He does have a “family”, one created over time, but he’s basically on his own.  And life far from safe—he encounters unsavory sorts, like a creepy fellow who offers him drugs and propositions and ghastly gang members who taunt and threaten.

The homeless hold a place in my heart and soul, and this book struck a chord with me.  The story is a solid, if not eye-opening read.  And it’s not for the weak-hearted; living on the streets can be dangerous, and violent.

“How would you like to be branded like cattle?” the leader whispered.  “It only hurts for a short time, then you don’t fell a thing.”  The boy trembled as the bright-orange cherry came close to his eyelashes.  “What, fag, you scared?” With a burst of energy, the boy let out a long, high-pitched scream.  He stepped down hard on someone’s foot and managed to break free.  Swinging his bag again, he smacked the gang leader in the eye, knocking the cigarette out of his hand.  “Assholes!” the boy yelled.  He ran toward the snack bar, loud jeer sounding behind him. “We’re not pau with you, faggot!” the leader called after him.  “We’ll be back, you’ll see!”  The gang hooted and howled as the boy, exhausted, slumped behind a sea-grape tree, wishing with all of his heavy heart for his grandmother to come back and make this nightmare go away.

We learn how this young teen lives—survives—but also [happily] discover there are kind-hearted people to be found.  It’s not hard to envision him people-watching, interacting (with wariness), swimming in the brilliant-blue Pacific, pawing through garbage for food and castoffs, searching for money, and standing his ground, regardless of fear.

What makes him different from countless other ill-starred kids?  ‘Ikau can view the future via clouds.  Upon hearing from his dead grandmother in a dream to locate Mariah Wong (a name he’s not familiar with), ‘Ikau begins a journey to find himself, as well as use his gifts.  As he undertakes this odyssey with an owl spirit guide, he learns about Hawaiian culture and traditions, as well as his family’s history.

For those of you unfamiliar with Matthew Kaopio, he became a mouth-brush artist and writer while undergoing rehabilitation for a severe spinal injury that occurred while swimming; it left him a quadriplegic.  His first book was Hawaiian Family Legends.  I’ve not yet checked it out, but I understand it “combines ancient Hawaiian oral storytelling with modern-day painting”.  Written in the Sky, interestingly enough, incorporates Kaopio’s own experiences in Ala Moana Park during the rehabilitation process and is also based on a 2004 Master’s thesis in Pacific Island Studies.

One last fascinating fact: he was also a skilled chanter.

“Chanting and poetry are ways of harnessing the spiritual and magical power of the spoken word.”

Sadly, this talented man is no longer among us, but his wonderful works carry on.

The Stand-Alone Sequel—A Review of Hiding Cracked Glass

I’ve never been one to read a sequel without having read the prequel.  Not my preferred reading tactic.  So, when I volunteered to read/review Hiding Cracked Glass by fellow blogger and writer (and wearer of numerous hats) James J. Cudney IV, I’d decided to read both—decided, but then didn’t.  I was curious to see if a sequel could stand on its own.  You know what?  It can. 

Something I should share—I loathe tales/books that:

  • stay within a tight timeframe (an afternoon, a day)
  • provide an overabundance of different characters’ stories or perspectives.

Oddly enough, while Hiding Cracked Glass does both, I didn’t mind either, not one bit.  In fact, the way the accounts intertwine and the events flow, it worked very well.  There are a also few flashbacks that provide insight into what makes who tick: relationships (affairs, divorces, marriages), vices and illegalities.

A brief summary per our esteemed author:

An ominous blackmail letter appears at an inopportune moment. The recipient’s name is accidentally blurred out upon arrival. Which member of the Glass family is the ruthless missive meant for? In the powerful sequel to Watching Glass Shatter, Olivia is the first to read the nasty threat and assumes it’s meant for her. When the mysterious letter falls into the wrong hands and is read aloud, it throws the entire Glass family into an inescapable trajectory of self-question. Across the span of eight hours, Olivia and her sons contemplate whether to confess their hidden secrets or find a way to bury them forever. Some failed to learn an important lesson last time. Will they determine how to save themselves before it’s too late?

Will they indeed?  I won’t provide clues as to the outcome <he, he> but I’m sure, like me, you’ll find yourself riveted as the plot twists and turns through and around the intriguing characters.  Olivia Glass is the matriarch, a strong woman, who knows that one son, now deceased, was switched at birth.  Now, on the day of her birthday celebration, it appears someone has sent a menacing letter that speaks to revenge . . . a devastating letter that soon becomes known to all.

I rather enjoyed following Olivia’s attempt to unravel the mystery.  Who sent the letter?  Who might have shared the information re the son’s true lineage?  What will transpire as a result?  How will the family be impacted?  I also liked the afternoon soap opera feel: every character has a story, history, a setback or dilemma.  Life is not always designer champagne and long-stemmed roses, no matter how wealthy you are.  There are cracks—imperfections—in these “Glasses”.

Jay’s come a long way.  He’s always been dedicated and diligent—this is his ninth book in three years!—but he’s also someone who absorbs and applies what he’s learned.  He’s always been a good writer, but with Cracked, he’s become a great one.

What can I say but a 5/5.  Well done, my friend!

Rating:savesavesavesavesave 

Please check out Jay at:

♦ Website:  https://jamesjcudney.com/  ♦ Blog:  https://thisismytruthnow.com  ♦ Amazon:  http://bit.ly/JJCIVBooks  ♦ Next Chapter:  https://www.nextchapter.pub/authors/james-j-cudney  ♦ BookBub:  https://www.bookbub.com/profile/james-j-cudney

WP1jaytourlogo. . . And a quick thank you to Shalini of digitalreadsblogtours.wordpress.com for organizing the blog-book tour.  She’s done an amazing job.

Please enter the raffle to obtain a copy of this suspenseful sequel (that can . . . stand alone):

https://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/e5ee1a9220/?

Review: James J. Cudney IV & Frozen Stiff Drink

Frozen Stiff Drink marks Book #6 in James J. Cudney’s Braxton Campus Mysteries—a series I (and many others) are quite fond of.

Before providing a taste of this delightful whodunit page-turner, I feel compelled to compliment Jay on his progression as an author.  His writing style—first-rate to begin with—keeps improving with every book.  The wry humor is wonderful.  Descriptions/details are enough not to overwhelm (or bore) and enable readers to vividly visualize persons and places.  And the repartee between characters is also deserving of praise.

In Frozen, Kellan Ayrwick, the protagonist, deals with a newcomer on the security scene, an arrogant fellow—the not-yet-ex of April, the woman he’s dating—named “Fox” (and he certainly seems as wily as one).  Meanwhile, the not-too-well-liked Hiram Grey is murdered.  Once again, there’s an assortment of suspects and, to complicate things, Grey’s murder is but the first.  Hampton, Kellan’s brother, falls under suspicion when his father-in-law (and founder of the firm where he works) also enters the realm of the deceased.  The intriguing plot has numerous [fun] twists and turns that has us surmising throughout.

Oh, let’s not forget our favorite granny, the sometimes biting but lovable Nana D, who also happens to be mayor of Wharton County.  She goes missing during a fierce snowstorm and Kellan, understandably frantic, attempts to find her.  Does he?  You’ll have to pick up Frozen Stiff Drink to find out.

Kellan’s adorable eight-year-old daughter, Emma, and his ward, Ulan, travel to Disney Land with Kellan’s parents.  Enter ex-wife Francesca, a woman with ties to the mob (you’ll have to read the other Braxton Campus mysteries to learn more), wants her daughter back.  So not good.

If you’ve been following the series, you’ll find several familiar characters—some likable, some not.  Hey, that’s life.  And if you’ve not yet had an opportunity to read any of Jay’s books, I recommend starting from the beginning, because it’s always nice to see how characters, and writers, develop.

The entertaining, keep-you-on-the-edge-of-your-seat Frozen Stiff Drink deserves a five out of five.  Park up your feet, grab a beverage of choice (a glass of a lush, full-bodied rioja would be an ideal choice), sit back . . . and savor!

Rating: savesavesavesavesave

For those who don’t yet know Jay, he is a truly amazing and industrious soul (who also happens to be an awesome, supportive person).  With a technology and business ops background under his belt, Jay not only serves as author, but blogger, reader and reviewer, and genealogist and researcher.  Impressive, to say the least.

Please check him out at:

https://jamesjcudney.com/

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What’s in a Whisper?

A lot.

For some time, I’ve been wanting to read and review Owen Clough’s first book, Whispers of the Past.  Finally, thankfully, the opportunity presented itself.  And what a treat.  Like the title, the turned pages whispered a fascinating tale.

Set in New Zealand, Whispers incorporates historical fiction, time travel, a little fantasy and a lot of adventure with stupendous results.  The exciting story begins with three young mates—Bob (Brill), Shane (Grunt), and Samuel (Sam)—engaging in a “tramp” into Tongariro National Park to cull feral pigs, not the easiest [or most pleasant] of tasks.

An odd bout of weather propels the trio to the Waikato War of 1863, including the Battle of Rangiriri, a major engagement in the invasion of Waikato.  Skirmishes occur, as do trials and tribulations, which add to the action and emotion.  Along the path to finding a way back . . . without altering history . . . the threesome encounter intriguing individuals, some who turn out to be ancestors.

The narration sounds everyday, natural with local vernacular, which makes for a fairly smooth read.  The characters are strong, believable, and very likable.  Physical descriptions and historical details enhance the read even more.  Owen has a knack for providing particulars—with enthralling twists and turns—that make you want to continue flipping pages: you just have to know what happens next.  And while you’re following the exciting adventures of Brill, Grunt and Sam, you learn a few things about New Zealand and the Māori.

The New Zealand War, by the by, was a succession of armed struggles that occurred from 1845 through 1872; on one side were the Colonial government and the allied Māori, and on the other side were the Māori and Māori-allied settlers.  And for those unfamiliar with the Māori, they’re indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand who arrived from eastern Polynesia in several waves of waka (a Māori canoe made of tree trunk) voyages in the early 14th century.

Entertainment and knowledge do make for great bedfellows.

I’d love to tell you that all ends well for Brill, Grunt and Sam, that they get back to present day . . . but I can’t.  You’ll have to read this engaging book to find out.

The editor in me can only give this a 4.5 due to typos and punctuation flaws.  Without those, it’s an easy 5 out of 5.

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And what about the author, Owen Clough?  His bio lists him as a keen genealogist, motor caravanner, and rugby fanatic with a love of history.   You can check him out at: https://www.owencloughbooks.com.

WPowen3booksHaving always wondered what it would be like to live back in the turbulent times of New Zealand’s history, Owen wrote Whispers of the Past with this in mind. The second book is Shadows of the Mind . . . the third, Clearing of the Mist.

Kia ora (be safe).

 

Review: With Her Fists by Henry Roi

Is it [exceptional] bad luck or being in the wrong place at the [dreadfully] wrong time?  Or a question of both?  One fateful day, Clarice Carter and her hubby, Ace, are conducting business as usual at their shop, Custom Ace, and the next they’re both in correctional facilities—for the long haul.  Who do they have to thank?  A couple of nasty, dirty cops with ties to The Teacher and a no-holds-barred cartel.

Speaking of holds, Clarice “Shocker the Fighter” Carter is a bantam-weight pugilist with numerous wins under her belt.  Being a skilled boxer comes in handy when you’re behind bars, living under conditions that go beyond trying.  But this gal’s strong and determined, and she’ll do what’s necessary to survive—and escape.

WPbookRoiABCWhen you have cellmates with names like Death Punch, Boogerilla and Tattoo Face, you know trouble can’t be far off.  With Her Fists, Henry Roi’s gritty and raw debut novel surges like a whitewater river.  The action is intense, and the details and descriptions are so thorough that you can effortlessly visualize settings and characters (some in all their scary, unsavory splendor).

The facts re boxing and tattooing create an additional layer of realness, and there’s humor, too, which helps alleviate the ugliness of correctional life (and death).

“So peanut butter and jelly with sweat pants and a side order of hand towelettes,” Eddy said.  “Thank you for choosing Fugitive King.  Please drive around to the window.”

“I want fries and a divorce with that,” Ace added.  “I’m citing ‘irreconcilable driving differences’.”

“He screamed like a girl,” Clarice informed them.  Eddy merely chuckled.  Bobby sounded like he was choking to death.

While they waited on delivery service from Fugitive King, Ace and Clarice walked down to the water.  Held hands and sat on the sand bar, fully exposed in all its smelly glory, low tide waters lapping gently against the small beach and bank connected to it.  An early morning fisherman motored his skiff out around the marsh islands a couple hundred yards in the distance, sea gulls hovering over him, man and boat silhouetted from the rising sun 93,000,000 miles behind him. 

Ace gripped her hand.  “Should I moon that guy?” he said.

Clarice looked at him, shocked, and gasped, “No!  What’s wrong with you?  Act your age, dude.”

He just smirked.  Stood and offered her his hand.  Clarice took it and gained her feet.  He bowed and kissed her fingers.

Then they turned around and exposed their glowing rear-ends to the fisherman.

With Her Fists receives a 4.5 rating (the editor in me has to deduct ½ point because of typos and inconsistencies like italics usage).

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The author, Henry Roi, was born and raised on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, and finds inspiration in its places and people.  As a GED tutor and fitness instructor, and advocate of adult education in all forms, he works one-on-one as well as on-line.  Personal interests, not surprisingly, include: tattoo art, prison reform, and auto mechanics.

This talented writer also focuses on promoting indie writers by arranging reviews, delivering media campaigns, and running blog tours.

You can find Henry on Twitter and Facebook @HenryRoiPR.

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