Preamble to the Prologue

Some writers will present details, after details, after details.  And usually via one character.  Sometimes it works; most times it doesn’t. Why?  Readers get lost.  And bored.  Eyes acquire a when-do-we-arrive glaze—like someone who’s been drifting in an oarless canoe on a vast sea with un-viewable shorelines.

Yes, please, provide background, particularly if past events impact the present or it’s crucial we’re aware of certain pre-existing facts.  Look at it this way.  You’re sitting in a café or at work, and a colleague recounts his/her weekend or report-analyzing discoveries.  Do you truly want to hear every detail—what transpired in exhaustive succession, minute by minute?  If you do, kudos; that’s awesome.  Most of us, however, don’t have the time or fascination (attention) factor.  We want the nitty-gritty, the significant points.

One way to give readers that nitty-gritty: show, don’t tell.  Offer more action and less dialogue (“text-book narration”).  If there’s a lot of detailed (important) history to impart, consider a prologue.  This introduction sets us up for what’s to occur; it gives insight into why a plot twist might have occurred or why it happens when it does.  It supplies that little extra information that progresses the storyline and/or pivotal scenes.

A quick example.  Earth has been overtake by aliens and all humans are now slaves.  Jenkins, a slave overseer, decides to tell a young slave, new to the enclave, how the current state of the world came to exist.  He tells and he tells, and he tells.  For five pages … with lengthy paragraphs of dialogue (interspersed with “I said” or “I explained how”).  It might prove more interesting if a prologue does the detailing—of the tense action, bitter battle, and triumphant leaders.  Feel free to do it in five (even ten) pages.  Open the prologue with a simple heading, such as “Five-hundred years previous”.

Check out prologues to get a feel for them.  Try writing them from different perspectives.  You may even find the exercise fun, but if nothing else, you’ll learn what works (and what doesn’t).

Consider your book a map with a legend, which is the prologue.  Like a descriptive table, it provides context … it’s the key that makes that road [through the plot] easier to navigate. WPProlGISGeography

Hula-ing to Happiness

The cover of Can You Hula Like Hilo Hattie?, the second Triple Threat Investigation Agency book, has a new cover.  I couldn’t be happier.  Well, okay, if I won the big lottery pot, I’d likely be a bit happier, but I’m still pretty delighted.  Thanks Creativia; you do great work!

It’s in keeping, and as eye-catching, as the others.  Simple yet inviting.

And what do the private eyes think about this one?  JJ’s loves the “bobble” hula dancer (she has one in her Jeep).  Linda, as always, believes the colors, font, and design are outstanding.  And Rey’s swaying with praise, which is delightful, given her initial response when told their “pretty P.I. faces” would no longer be featured (which we won’t repeat here, as it may make some people’s ears curl). WPhula2B

Now I have to commit to that promise of getting things rolling promo-wise (something rather intimidating, if not overwhelming, for this ol’ gal).  Wish me luck.  <LOL>

The Rookie Writer & Please Don’t Dos

Rookie/newbie writers are still finding their voices.  There’s a major learning curve; we’ve all been there and it’s all good.

I’ve returned to the world of editing—on a part-time, freelance basis.  It’s always been a joy of mine and, hopefully, it will eventually become full-time. (Keeping the faith and holding hope.)  As such, I feel compelled to share a little editing advice though the next couple of posts.  Let’s start with two, hmm, let’s call them missteps.

These two “please don’t dos” seem to occur in blissful abundance (I feel the joy).  Please note, my enthusiastic friends, neither of the following lends itself to strengthening a plot or story if employed with said aforementioned bliss.

#1 – The Exclamation Mark/Point

This punctuation mark is used to demonstrate strong feelings or emotions,  to indicate yelling, or to present emphasis.  It shouldn’t end every second sentence.  Nor should it be used willy-nilly.

For example:

  “Not Jeremy again!” Marvin commented, strolling around the heap of debris on the kitchen floor.

  “He’s so clumsy!” Greta added, annoyed. “Some people just don’t do anything and get away with it!  It’s so not fair!”

  “It’s not fair, you are so right!” Marvin agreed. “It shouldn’t be us cleaning up his mess!”

Try something like this:

  “Not Jeremy again?” Marvin asked with a sour smile, avoiding the debris on the kitchen floor as he strolled to the cupboard.

  “He’s so clumsy,” Greta stated, her expression a cross between annoyance and anger.  “Some people won’t do a solitary thing to help.  And they get away with it.  It’s so unfair!”

  “You’re so right,” he agreed, cross.  “We shouldn’t be cleaning up his mess.”

Use an exclamation mark when appropriate, and preferably in dialogue.  Sure, it can be used in the narrative, be it first-person or third.  But keep it to a minimum.  Allow readers to react to—experience—the action (tension, friction, sentiment).  Don’t push them into it by tossing in countless exclamation marks.

Instead of:

  “We’d better tell them what we saw!” Lee said.

  Terry looked worried. “You tell them!  I don’t like the folks in blue!”

Try something like:

  “We’d better tell them what we saw,” Lee said anxiously, crossing her arms and peering into the darkness.

  Worried, Terry slipped behind the window curtain.  “You tell them.  I don’t like the folks in blue.”

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Augment.  Add appropriate verbs and augment with an adjective or adverb (if appropriate) to create—extract—that emotion you’re striving for.  Insert more description—not so much as to cause readers’ eyes to glaze over, but enough to paint vivid pictures.

#2 – CAPITAL LETTERS

A capital letter is used in various capacities—at the start of a new sentence, proper nouns (name, places, things), titles in the signature of a letter/email, specific regions, films and songs, and so forth.  DO NOT USE CAPITAL LETTERS LIKE THIS: IN A SENTENCE OR DIALOGUE TO CONVEY SHOUTING OR FEELING. WPediting2C1

Instead of:

  John grabbed Lidia’s hand.  “DON’T GO IN THERE!”

Try:

  John grabbed Lidia’s hand and urgently warned her not to enter.

  John grabbed Lidia’s hand and fretfully said, “Don’t go in there.”

A few extra words here and there can add much, and decrease redundancy or overkill.  Allow your story to swim like a dolphin—gracefully and effortlessly.

HAVE AN AWESOME WEEK! . . . er . . . Bask in the sun-splashed summer days to come.

Jumping on the Blog Tour Bandwagon

The Writer’s Grab-Bag isn’t a stop on the book tour, and the original plan was to wait until the end  . . .  but what the heck?  Let’s aim for sooner than later.

James J. Cudney IV—Jay—has a fourth book in the Braxton Campus Mysteries called Mistaken Identity Crisis.  I had an opportunity to read it a wee while back and thoroughly enjoyed it, as I did the others.  It has all the elements of a cozy— an affable protagonist [with adorable young daughter], likable regulars, a host of suspects, and the putting-together-the-pieces-of-the-puzzle mystery. WPJay3

Kellan is a Braxton professor and amateur sleuth.  He has a supportive family, love interest, and eccentric in-your-face grandmother you gotta love. The case officially begins when a missing ruby is found near an electrified dead body during the campus cable-car redesign project.  Not only must Kellan must locate the real killer to protect his brother, he has a delicate if not dangerous personal family matter to resolve.  Add a sundry of jewel thefts to the murder, feuding mobsters, and you have a thrilling, fun whodunit.

Come visit Wharton County.  Get to know the townspeople.  Learn how Nana D does as the new mayor.  Follow Kellan as he sorts through the suspect list . . . and solves the case.

A worthwhile read, my friends.  Enjoy!

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Learn more about Jay’s books at https://jamesjcudney.com.

I like You . . . You Like Me?

Let’s look at the basics—how to get more likes on social media.  More likes means more followers and traffic.  Gotta like that.  <LOL> WPlike1

♥  Share photos/images that grab a viewer’s attention.  Get to understand which ones get more likes; create/offer similar ones. 

♥  Use hashtags and calls to action.  If you want likes, request them.  Add something as simple as “Please like my post”.  Easy-peasy.

♥  Reshare/retweet.  If you’re on other social networks, re-share.  Nothing wrong with that.  Communicate with—attract—everyone and anyone.

♥  Like other people’s posts.  But don’t do it merely for the sake of it . . . and don’t like something because everyone else seems to.  Be selective; be sincere.

♥  Like company/business posts.  As appropriate, of course.  This shows others (those followers we all want) what we’re into.

♥  Run a contest.  If it’s doable, have a like and tag contest.  You don’t simply ask people to like your post, you request that they tag someone they know in the post/comments.

Time plays a part when it comes to likes—there’s more interchange with posts published between 10:00 p.m. and 3:00 a.m. (evidently, less folks are on-line).  Give it a try; see what works.

Hope you liked the basics of liking.  Feel free to like me . . . as I like you.

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That’s Amore

“When the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that’s amore . . .”

Written by Jac Brooks and Harry Warren in the early 50s, Dean Martin sang that catchy upbeat song like no one else.

amore = l’amour = love

As bloggers and writers, we have amore for our crafts.  It’s a drive, a passion, something we can’t imagine not doing.  As such, we should endeavor to make it the best we can.

And to make it the best we can, we need to constantly be editing, so that our:

♥  words are fresh

♥   writing is readable (attention-grabbing)

♥   posts and books have readers wanting to come back for more!

Writing is like building a pizza pie.  You have your basic layer with tomato sauce and cheese: the plot/storyline.  Then you build.  WPpizza1

Add characters and complications (tension, conflict, quests).  Throw in complexity (twists and turns, enemies and frenemies).  Boost the “flavor” with logic and resolution(s).

If the ingredients don’t quite come together, that’s okay.  We build another one—the right one, the perfect one.

Rejoice in the final product, the appealing bouquet.  That’s amore.

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Foever Poi . . . Forever Happy

The cover for Forever Poi is ready—thank you, Creativia!

The purple and red work well . . . attention-grabbing in its simplicity.

How do the gals feel about this one?  JJ’s likes the lips—they speak to her.  Linda thinks the colors and font are hot.  Rey loves the lipstick (a shade she’d wear in a blink).  As an FYI, the tsking and sighs have ceased; she’s officially over the fact she and her colleagues no longer grace the covers.WPForeverPoi4

When the last cover arrives, that makeover for The Triple Threat Investigation Agency Facebook page (and this blog) are gonna happen.

Speaking of happen, if anyone would like to help make this new book happen, I’d be very grateful . . . thankful, happy, delighted, grateful, overjoyed, stoked, grateful, indebted, and pleased.

. . . Did I say grateful?

Tags & Hash

I confess—readily—that I don’t know the first thing about tagging or hashtags.  Blame it on my “sheltered” time-constrained life.  <LOL>

It’s okay.  My lack of knowledge is our gain.  It got me to research the basics of tagging and hashtagging, and this I happily share.

A tag, for the record, is a word/phrase that is preceded by a hash mark (#), and is used in a message or post to locate a keyword or topic of interest, and then expedite a search for it.  When you add a # to your message or post, social media/networking sites will index it; it then becomes searchable (“findable”) by others.  In simple terms, hashtags categorize content.

I’m a Facebooker, so let’s look take a look-see at FB—where you can tag a person, someone in a pic, and somebody in a post.

To tag a person (by name), start a post or comment on another post, pic, or vid.  Type the person’s name anywhere in that post or comment (FB offers suggestions when you’re typing, by the way).  Another option: type @ before you enter the name.  This informs FB that you intend to tag someone in your post or comment.  Select the name you want to tag when it appears and then select “Post”.  Ta-da.  Your post/comment will be posted and the “tagee” will be notified he/she has been tagged.

To tag someone or a page in a pic, click it to expand it.  Hover over the photo and type the person’s name.  Use the full name of the person or page you want to tag when it appears.  Click “Done Tagging”.  Be aware: when you tag a pic that wasn’t uploaded by a Friend, the person who uploaded it must approve the tag.

To tag somebody in a post, begin a fresh post by going into the box where your personal pic/icon is—where you see “What’s on your mind?” in faint gray font.  If you look beneath the post box, beside “Photo/Video”, you’ll find “Tag People”.  Next, you’ll see “Who are you with?”.  Type the name of someone (add more if you wish).  Write something and hit “Post”.  The person you tagged will be notified that you tagged him/her in a post.

What about hashtagsYou can make anything into a hashtag by adding # in front of a word or phrase.  (Seen it, not done it.)  Add the # and then start typing—you’ll see the #xxx highlighted in pale blue.  Once completed, post. The now bold tag will be in your status update; click on the status bar to have that hashtag automatically added to an update.  Sweet.

Once the post is up, you can click on your new tag to see who’s using that same phrase and what they’re saying.

The thing about a hashtag is to create one that serves a purpose—one that will be of use several times over.  As an FYI, you can learn which hashtags are trending (check out Hashtagify, RiteTag, and # hashtags.org, among others).  It’s advised, depending on the site, to avoid using several in one message or post.  Keep them simple and don’t use too many words.

Let’s end with a bit of trivia.  Did you know the first hashtag used in social media is credited to Chris Messina (a former Google employee)?  It happened in a Tweet—in 2007.  The word “hashtag” wasn’t added to the dictionary (Oxford, to be precise) until 2010. WPTagHash123RFDOTcom

. . . #happytagging.

Insta-Laughter?

We all have our idiosyncrasies and quirks, skills and strengths . . . failings and weaknesses.  Mine?  Technology.

I’ve come a long way, though.  I don’t cringe or sprint away when a new challenge or task comes my way.  Groaning and moaning, well, that’s another thing, er, things.

Facebook I feel fairly calm with.  Can’t tag worth <bleep>, but I can post!  Pat on back to moi.  Twitter I no longer have panic attacks about.  Can’t Tweet to save my life, however.  What am I supposed to—expected to—convey?  I’m not a poet or photographer with regular “product” to show.  I’m not a disgruntled person with a bone to pick.  LinkedIn serves its purpose without a doubt but, personally, it leaves me cold; as such, it receives a visit maybe twice a year. WPInstapngimgDOTcom

My last/latest “adventure” was with Instagram.  I signed up at the end of 2017.  Couldn’t figure out how to post anything—no laughing, please.  Didn’t return until a week ago.  Dang (as Linda would say)—double dang with an expletive (as Rey would shout)—I couldn’t remember or find my password.  Had to sign up again.  Then, of course, I found my old user name, but the new account won’t recognize the old one.  It’s a bit of a mess.  Do I erupt with tears or burst into laughter at the insanity of it all?

I always like to provide a little background re the focus of my post, so-o . . . did you know Instagram, which has been around nearly a decade, is owned by Facebook?  Among other things, “Insta” has messaging features, the ability to follow other users’ feeds, and you can add a whack of pics and vids in one post.  Kind of cool . . . if you’re into pics and vids.  One day, I suspect I might be but, at the moment, uh-uh, can’t/won’t happen.  That’s okay; everything in its time.

Project for the weekend: figure out how to get the accounts de-mucked.

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. . . I do believe I feel a few ROTFLs coming on.

Spam, Shmam . . . and Not the Ham

Okay, technically it’s canned cooked pork.  But the name Spam is a derivative of “spiced ham”, so-o . . . .  By the by, did you know it’s a Hawaiian favorite?  Indeedy-do.  So much so, there’s an annual Spam Festival (which I have had the pleasure of attending).

I digress again.

Recently, I’d planned to respond to a comment.  To the Comments page I went—and noticed [finally] that a number were in the Spam section.  OMG.  How had I never spotted that?  Not seeing for looking?

The plan: delete, delete, delete.  But as I started sifting through them, I realized half weren’t Spam (not the ham).  OMG.  I’d never replied and I should have (or, at the very least, liked).  How rude people must think me!

A few offered advice as to how I could/should improve the blog.  The suggestions were all valid—and appreciated.  Yes, one day I will apply the recommendations . . . when I can embrace Time as a close friend. WP1spamtimeAmeeHouse

Thank you everyone.  I’ll be checking out Spam more frequently in the future (maybe even with a side of eggs and rice).