Script$ and Sale$

Thought I’d continue re the last story-to-script post and touch a wee bit on the $ component.

Can money be made selling scripts?  Of course.  Is it easy?  Depends on who you read and/or listen to.  If you can make the film yourself, awesome and all the better—but it takes bucks (as in budget) and background (as in know-how)—so if neither is an option, then start pitching.  Before that happens, however, a few “musts” enter the equation. WPUse6

The [well-written] script must be fantastic.  The concept and storyline have to stand out and the characters should prove dynamic.  As such, revise that script until it’s seamless.

Get feedback—genuine feedback.  And yes, it can come from friends and followers.  Family?  Maybe.  Accept input with a grain of salt.  It’s very nice to have Cousin Martha-May effusively state what a gifted writer you are and doesn’t the script just read peachy-keen, but it’s not going to help much in the hoping-and-planning-to-sell department.  You need critical advice.  How does the script [truly] read?  Is it logical?  Are there typos and glaring errors or inconsistencies?  Ensure that script is the best it can be.

There must be an accompanying persuasive pitch.  Keep it short and sweet, and strong.  Impress the reader (filmmaker, producer, agent, whomever) so that he/she wants to see the script.  Keep calling, emailing, contacting—and make sure you know who you’re pitching (selling) to.  Be positive and forthright, and grab attention.

Part of that persuasive pitch is having an awesome log-line (a one or two sentence summation of your script).  It must convey the premise and provide a snapshot of the overall storyline.

You must network, network, and network.  Put yourself and your work out there.  Get to know as many [influential/connected] people as possible.  Apply yourself.  Recognize that it may take time and be patient (and persevering).  Use social media to your advantage.  Join relevant communities.  Acquire contacts.  Join script-writing groups.  Dare I say it again?  You must network, network, and network.  FBSatUse2

Researching sites to locate lists of [credible] film people is a must, too, because unless Great-Uncle Waldo works for a major film studio, you’ll need leads.  Sure, they’re already receiving queries by the <bleep>-load.  Don’t let that deter you.  You never know: your script might just be THE one.

Posting about your work and projects is also a must.  If you’re a blogger, inform your followers/visitors; if you’re not a blogger, become one.  Use every possible promotional tool.

Podcasts, conferences, and classes with film and media folks are worth checking out.  They can lead to connections—can, not will—but you’ll acquire tips, learn new/interesting facts, and make acquaintances.  Don’t discount these avenues.

If the idea of scriptwriting tickles your fancy, go for it.  Simply view the making-sale$ part as another challenge—which we know we can triumph over with determination and commitment, and amazing self-promo skills (which are honed with practice and persistence).