About Me, Us, You, Whatever – by Reynalda-Fonne Werde (Post Writer Extraordinaire)

Hey there.  I’m back for another post.  Last time, I gave some advice re professional email addresses.  JJ and Linda said I’d done a pretty decent job for someone who’s not a fan of writing.  But as I may have mentioned, I’m kinda getting to like it.  (And, between you and me, I think I’m better than “decent”.)

We’re updating The Triple Threat Investigation Agency website and blog to look and read more professional.  Linda’s gotten agency emails in motion and JJ’s revamping the “About Us” page.  It’s nice enough, but not great.  So this post’s about doing a dynamite one based on what we learned from fellow P.I.s and successful local business folks.

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Have some strategically placed photos relevant to your business; this will break up and balance the “About” page.  The word back when: eye candy.  You want that page to be visually appealing and you don’t want word overload.

Tell visitors what you do and what makes you qualified to do it.  Cite a success or two.  You don’t have to write an essay.  Be short and sweet.  A paragraph is fine.

Communicate enthusiasm for what you do and why you do it.  Ditto re the short and sweet.

Mention professional (and possibly personal, depending on what you’re “about”) successes.  Success for the Triple Threat Investigation Agency: solving a murder case and, on a more everyday note, locating a lost pooch.

Disclose what it is you want to (can) do.  For the agency: handle all types of investigations with utmost discretion.

Have a sentence or phrase or two expressing the spirit and/or purpose of your business.  Place them, like your photos, strategically on the “About Me” / “About Us” page.  Grab attention.  This one I’m just throwing out and it’s probably not too original, but given we’re a P.I. agency, we might state something like: “No Case Too Big or Too Small.”  You got the idea.

Contact info in a corner (in addition to an actual Contact Page) is something worth adding.  Make it super easy (accessible) for people to contact you.

You could also provide a personal message.  Again, keep it brief.

Feel free to include links—to articles, posts, reviews, your email address.  Determine what’s important/relevant and do it.

A couple of additional things to consider when you’re putting it together is how you’re going to write it (first person or third) and what type of tone you’ll use (humorous versus serious).  Make sure it reflects you / your business.

Hopefully, I’ve given some solid advice for that “About” page.  The Boss is back next week, as an FYI.  And I’m off to the spa now (nothing better than a facial and massage to get yourself feeling like a million dollars).

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Aloha!

Here a Script, There a Script

Continuing with the theme of scriptwriting, set by a previous post, let’s touch upon a few “must know” / “must do” notes.  The dry yawny stuff.  But totally relevant and required.

Here are some quick [painless] facts:

Fact:  Scripts/screenplays are typed on 8 ½” X 11” white paper.  Who knew it’s supposed to be 3-holed (obviously not me, LOL).  As I’m assuming you’re simplifying your life by using software like Final Draft, I’ll refrain from margin dimensions and page numbering (zzzzzzz).

Fact:  Courier 12 is the font of choice in the great U.S. of A.  Why?  Interestingly enough, it’s all about timing.  One script page with this font = 1 minute of on-screen time.

Fact:  The average feature film script is between 95 and 125 pages long, (with an average of 114).  Dramas are generally longer than comedies.

Fact:  Scripts are written in three acts.  (If you’re really curious, go on-line to check the actual number of pages per act in relation to a given genre.)  The first introduces characters and situation(s) and sets up the plot.  The second provides challenges and obstacles, and character development.  The third presents resolution.

Fact:  Action is written in present tense, active voice.  (Tom watches furtively from behind a curtain as Cecilia takes aim.)

This circles back to editing (something I thoroughly enjoy, though there can be some agonizing this-really-needs-to-go moments).  Check for dull dialog, nonsensical actions or reactions, flat characters.  Watch the number of scenes—is each one moving the story/plot forward?  If not, delete it.  You want a clean, crisp script . . . just as you want clean, crisp writing (be it a novel, article, or post).

All the dos and don’ts truly comprise a [big, fat] book.  But if you use scriptwriting software, you’re halfway on your exciting quest.  The rest comes from doing due diligence and practice.  Get feedback, too; don’t be scared to show your work to friends and colleagues.

Happy scriptwriting.

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(Note: this was previously posted, but live and learn—if you use the classic version of a certain photo editor, the pics don’t anchor.  A wee bit of advice: “review” your blog now and again; you never know what you might discover.)

Proofreading = Checking = Correcting . . . or Bloopers & Blunders Begone

Let’s continue with the topic of editing, but shift a wee bit.  What about proofreading (or proofing)?  Or copy-editing and line-editing?  There are actually quite a few, but for all intents and purposes, let’s stick to proofing and editing.

Although they’re often used interchangeably, yes my friends, there is a difference.

Proofing basically entails reviewing a completed document to locate and fix typos, grammar and style mistakes—what I jokingly call bloopers and blunders.  The emphasis is on correcting superficial errors in spelling, grammar, composition, punctuation, and formatting.  Think of it as a “quality check”.

Editing includes proofing, but it’s more intensive.  In addition to the above, you’re taking into account how facts and details, and ideas are organized.  Editing isn’t a one-time action, by the way; you really need to edit several times.

Whether proofing or editing, set aside your work for a while after writing (a half hour, a day, week, or longer if you’re not in a rush).  This allows for “fresh eyes”.  You don’t always see the mistakes (those silly little oopsies) when you’re proofing or editing as you’re composing.

Between you and me, I find it best to proof and edit from a printed page.  But that’s l’il ol’ me (I’m still kinda old-school).  Some peeps do fine eyeballing documents on screen.  Whatever works.

I’ve heard it said you should read your work out loud to “hear” the off bits.  I’ve never done that once in my life.  But if you’re new to proofing and editing, it might prove a worthwhile endeavor.

Feel free to use a spell checker, but bear in mind it won’t catch correctly spelled words that have been erroneously utilized.  A simple example: “its” versus “it’s”.

There are also some fantastic on-line proofreaders.  I hear Grammarly is one of the best and you can use certain components for free.  If you plan to use one, do your due diligence and determine which is best for you.

Happy proofing!

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(Note: this was previously posted, but I’m forever living and learning—if you uses the “classic” version of a certain photo editor, pics don’t anchor.)